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Contents  

Long Title

Part I PRELIMINARY

Part II THE SUPREME COURT

Part III THE HIGH COURT

General

Original Jurisdiction

Singapore International Commercial Court

Appellate Jurisdiction of the High Court

Supervisory and Revisionary Jurisdiction

Allocation of Proceedings

Further Arguments

Part IV THE COURT OF APPEAL

Part IVA CIVIL JURISDICTION OF COURT OF APPEAL

Part V

Part VI OFFICERS AND OFFICES

Registrar

Sheriff

Accountant

Subordinate officers

Offices

Part VII MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

List of Touts

Disabilities of Registrar and other officers

Protection of Registrar and other officers

Rules of Court

Council of Judges

Supplemental

FIRST SCHEDULE Additional powers of the High Court

SECOND SCHEDULE

THIRD SCHEDULE Orders Made by District Court or Magistrate’s Court That Are Non-appealable

FOURTH SCHEDULE Orders Made by Judge That Are Non-appealable

FIFTH SCHEDULE Orders Made by Judge That Are Appealable Only With Leave

Legislative History

Comparative Table

 
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On 22/10/2017, you requested the version in force on 22/10/2017 incorporating all amendments published on or before 22/10/2017. The closest version currently available is that of 01/10/2017.
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Supreme Court of Judicature Act
(CHAPTER 322)

(Original Enactment: Act 24 of 1969)

REVISED EDITION 2007
(31st July 2007)
An Act relating to the constitution and powers of the superior courts of judicature.
[9th January 1970]
PART I
PRELIMINARY
Short title
1.  This Act may be cited as the Supreme Court of Judicature Act.
Interpretation
2.  In this Act, unless there is something repugnant in the subject matter or context —
“court” means a court established by this Act;
“Family Division of the High Court” means the Family Division of the High Court constituted under section 4 of the Family Justice Act 2014;
“Family Justice Rules” means the Family Justice Rules made under the Family Justice Act 2014 and any other written law by the Family Justice Rules Committee constituted under section 46(1) of that Act;
“Judge” means a Judge of the High Court and includes the Chief Justice and any person sitting in the High Court in accordance with section 9;
“Judge of Appeal” includes the Chief Justice and any person sitting in the Court of Appeal in accordance with section 29;
“Registrar” means the Registrar of the Supreme Court and includes the Deputy Registrar and the Assistant Registrars;
“Rules of Court” means Rules of Court made under this Act and includes forms;
“seal” includes stamp;
“subordinate court” means a court constituted under the State Courts Act (Cap. 321), a Family Court or Youth Court constituted under the Family Justice Act 2014, and any other court, tribunal or judicial or quasi-judicial body from the decisions of which under any written law there is a right of appeal to the Supreme Court.
[58/73; 16/93; 3/96]
[Act 5 of 2014 wef 07/03/2014]
PART II
THE SUPREME COURT
Divisions and jurisdiction of Supreme Court
3.  The Supreme Court shall be a superior court of record and shall consist of —
(a)
the High Court, which shall exercise original and appellate civil and criminal jurisdiction; and
(b)
the Court of Appeal, which shall exercise appellate civil and criminal jurisdiction.
[16/93]
Precedence
4.  The Judges of the Supreme Court shall take precedence in the following order:
(a)
the Chief Justice;
(b)
the Vice‑Presidents of the Court of Appeal, who among themselves shall rank according to the priority of their respective appointments as Vice‑Presidents;
(c)
the Judges of Appeal (other than Vice‑Presidents), who among themselves shall rank according to the priority of their respective appointments; and
(d)
the Judges of the High Court, who among themselves shall rank according to the priority of their respective appointments.
[16/93]
Acting appointment
5.
—(1)  Whenever during any period, owing to illness or absence from Singapore or any other cause, the Chief Justice is unable to exercise the powers or perform the duties of his office, such powers shall be had and may be exercised and such duties shall be performed by the Judge having precedence next after the Chief Justice who is present in Singapore and able to act during that period.
(2)  For the purposes of this section, temporary absence in any part of Malaysia shall not be deemed to be absence from Singapore.
International Judges
5A.  An International Judge of the Supreme Court may only sit in the Singapore International Commercial Court and in appeals from that Court in accordance with sections 9(4)(b) and 29(4), respectively.
Seal
6.  The Supreme Court shall have and use as occasion may require a seal of such nature and pattern as the Chief Justice may, by notification in the Gazette*, prescribe.
*  Cap. 322, N 1 (1990 Ed.).
Sittings in camera
8.
—(1)  The place in which any court is held for the purpose of trying any cause or matter, civil or criminal, shall be deemed an open and public court to which the public generally may have access.
(2)  The court shall have power to hear any matter or proceedings or any part thereof in camera if the court is satisfied that it is expedient in the interests of justice, public safety, public security or propriety, or for other sufficient reason to do so.
(2A)  A court may, in any matter or proceeding or any part thereof tried or held or to be tried or held before it, if satisfied that it is expedient in the interests of justice, public safety, public security or propriety, or for other sufficient reason to do so, order that —
(a)
the name, address or photograph of any witness; or
(b)
any evidence or any other thing likely to lead to the identification of such witness by a person other than the party to that matter or proceeding,
which is contained in any court document intended to be produced before the court, be removed or be sufficiently redacted.
[15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
(3)  A court may at any time order that no person shall —
(a)
publish the name, address or photograph of any witness in any matter or proceeding or any part thereof tried or held or to be tried or held before it, or any evidence or any other thing likely to lead to the identification of any such witness; or
(b)
do any other act which is likely to lead to the identification of such a witness.
[15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
(4)  Any person who acts in contravention of any order under subsection (2A) or (3) shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding $5,000 or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 3 years or to both.
[15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
PART III
THE HIGH COURT
General
Constitution of High Court
9.
—(1)  The High Court shall consist of —
(a)
the Chief Justice; and
(b)
the Judges of the High Court.
(2)  A Judge of Appeal may, if the Chief Justice so requires, sit in the High Court.
(3)  A Judicial Commissioner of the Supreme Court appointed for a specified period may sit in the High Court to hear and determine any case or such classes of cases as the Chief Justice may specify.
(4)  The Chief Justice may, from time to time —
(a)
require a Senior Judge of the Supreme Court appointed for a specified period to sit in the High Court to hear and determine any case or such classes of cases as the Chief Justice may specify; and
(b)
require an International Judge of the Supreme Court appointed for a specified period to sit in the Singapore International Commercial Court to hear and determine any case in that Court or such classes of cases in that Court as the Chief Justice may specify.
(5)  A person sitting in the High Court in accordance with subsection (2), (3) or (4), or to hear and determine a case that he was specifically appointed to hear and determine, shall have all the jurisdiction, powers and privileges of a Judge of the High Court sitting in the High Court or in the Singapore International Commercial Court, as the case may be.
Proceedings in High Court to be disposed of by single Judge
10.
—(1)  Every proceeding in the High Court and all business arising thereout shall, except as otherwise provided by any written law for the time being in force, be heard and disposed of before a single Judge.
(2)  A Judge may, subject to Rules of Court or Family Justice Rules, exercise in court or in chambers all or any part of the jurisdiction vested in the High Court, in all such causes and matters and in all such proceedings in any causes or matters as might immediately before 9th January 1970 have been heard in court or in chambers respectively by a single Judge, or as may be directed or authorised to be so heard by Rules of Court or Family Justice Rules for the time being in force.
(4)  If a Judge reserves judgment in any proceedings and his appointment as a Judge expires or is terminated before his judgment is delivered, he shall have power to deliver judgment in respect of those proceedings, notwithstanding that his appointment as a Judge has expired or has been terminated.
[3/96]
(5)  No Judge shall sit in the High Court on the hearing of, or determine any application in proceedings incidental or preliminary to —
(a)
an appeal from a judgment or an order made by him as the Presiding Judge of the State Courts or the Presiding Judge of the Family Justice Courts;
(b)
an appeal against a conviction before him or a sentence passed by him as the Presiding Judge of the State Courts or the Presiding Judge of the Family Justice Courts;
(c)
the consideration of any case stated by him under section 395 of the Criminal Procedure Code (Cap. 68) as the Presiding Judge of the State Courts or the Presiding Judge of the Family Justice Courts;
(d)
any application made under section 400 of the Criminal Procedure Code in relation to any judgment or order made, or sentence passed, by him as the Presiding Judge of the State Courts or the Presiding Judge of the Family Justice Courts; or
(e)
any proceedings relating to any judgment, order or direction made by him as the Presiding Judge of the State Courts or the Presiding Judge of the Family Justice Courts.
[Act 5 of 2014 wef 14/04/2014]
Assessors to assist High Court
10A.
—(1)  In any proceedings before the High Court, the Court may, if it thinks fit on the application of any party, or on its own motion, summon to its assistance, in such manner as may be prescribed by Rules of Court or Family Justice Rules, one or more persons of skill and experience in the matter to which the proceedings relate who may be willing to sit with the Court and act as assessors.
[16/93]
(2)  Subject to subsection (3), the remuneration of assessors for sitting under this section shall be at such rate as may be prescribed by Rules of Court or Family Justice Rules and shall be costs in the proceedings unless otherwise ordered by the High Court.
[16/93]
(3)  Where one or more assessors are summoned for the purposes of this section otherwise than on the application of a party to the proceedings, the remuneration of any such assessor shall be payable out of moneys provided by Parliament.
[16/93]
(4)  Where any person is proposed to be summoned as an assessor, objection to him, either personally or in respect of his qualification, may be taken by any party in the prescribed manner.
[16/93]
When High Court is open
10B.
—(1)  Subject to subsection (2), the High Court shall sit on every day of the year except on Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays.
[8/98; 2/2007]
(2)  Notwithstanding subsection (1), a Judge may lawfully sit on a Saturday, Sunday or public holiday or during a vacation prescribed under section 12 if —
(a)
the Chief Justice has directed the Judge to sit on that day or during that vacation; or
(b)
in the opinion of the Judge, the business to be despatched is extremely urgent.
[8/98; 2/2007]
Sittings of High Court and distribution of business
11.
—(1)  The High Court shall sit at such times and at such places as the Chief Justice shall from time to time appoint.
(2)  The distribution of business among the several Judges shall be made in accordance with such directions, which may be of a general or a particular nature, as may be given by the Chief Justice.
Vacations
12.  The Chief Justice may make such regulations as he thinks fit as to vacations of the Supreme Court not exceeding 2 months in any calendar year.
Writs of execution
13.  A judgment of the High Court for the payment of money to any person or into court may be enforced by a writ, to be called a writ of seizure and sale, under which all the property, movable or immovable, of whatever description, of a judgment debtor may be seized, except —
(a)
the wearing apparel and bedding of the judgment debtor or his family, and the tools and implements of his trade, when the value of such apparel, bedding, tools and implements does not exceed $1,000;
(b)
tools of artisans, and, where the judgment debtor is an agriculturist, his implements of husbandry and such animals and seed-grain or produce as may in the opinion of the court be necessary to enable him to earn his livelihood as such;
(c)
the wages or salary of the judgment debtor;
(d)
any pension, gratuity or allowance granted by the Government; and
(e)
the share of the judgment debtor in a partnership, as to which the judgment creditor is entitled to proceed to obtain a charge under any provision of any written law relating to partnership.
[16/93]
Execution of deed or indorsement of negotiable instrument
14.
—(1)  If a judgment or order is for the execution of a deed, or signing of a document, or for the indorsement of a negotiable instrument, and the party ordered to execute, sign or indorse such instrument is absent, or neglects or refuses to do so, any party interested in having the same executed, signed or indorsed, may prepare a deed, or document, or indorsement of the instrument in accordance with the terms of the judgment or order, and tender the same to the court for execution upon the proper stamp, if any is required by law, and the signature thereof by the Registrar, by order of the court, shall have the same effect as the execution, signing or indorsement thereof by the party ordered to execute.
(2)  Nothing in this section shall be held to abridge the powers of the court to proceed by attachment against any person neglecting or refusing to execute, sign or indorse any such instrument.
Original Jurisdiction
Criminal jurisdiction
15.
—(1)  The High Court shall have jurisdiction to try all offences committed —
(a)
within Singapore;
(b)
on board any ship or aircraft registered in Singapore;
(c)
by any person who is a citizen of Singapore on the high seas or on any aircraft;
(d)
by any person on the high seas where the offence is piracy by the law of nations;
(e)
by any person within or outside Singapore where the offence is punishable under and by virtue of the provisions of the Hijacking of Aircraft and Protection of Aircraft and International Airports Act (Cap. 124) or the Maritime Offences Act (Cap. 170B); and
(f)
in any place or by any person if it is provided in any written law that the offence is triable in Singapore.
[10/78; 16/93; 26/2003]
(2)  The High Court may pass any sentence allowed by law.
Civil jurisdiction — general
16.
—(1)  The High Court shall have jurisdiction to hear and try any action in personam where —
(a)
the defendant is served with a writ of summons or any other originating process —
(i)
in Singapore in the manner prescribed by Rules of Court or Family Justice Rules; or
(ii)
outside Singapore in the circumstances authorised by and in the manner prescribed by Rules of Court or Family Justice Rules; or
(b)
the defendant submits to the jurisdiction of the High Court.
[16/93]
[30/2010 wef 01/01/2011]
(2)  Without prejudice to the generality of subsection (1), the High Court shall have such jurisdiction as is vested in it by any other written law.
[16/93]
Civil jurisdiction — specific
17.  Without prejudice to the generality of section 16, the civil jurisdiction of the High Court shall include —
(a)
jurisdiction under any written law relating to divorce and matrimonial causes;
(b)
jurisdiction under any written law relating to matters of admiralty;
(c)
jurisdiction under any written law relating to bankruptcy or to companies;
(d)
jurisdiction to appoint and control guardians of infants and generally over the persons and property of infants;
(e)
jurisdiction to appoint and control guardians and keepers of the persons and estates of idiots, mentally disordered persons and persons of unsound mind; and
(f)
jurisdiction to grant probates of wills and testaments, letters of administration of the estates of deceased persons and to alter or revoke such grants.
[16/93]
Civil jurisdiction — concurrent jurisdiction with Syariah Court in certain matters
17A.
—(1)  Notwithstanding sections 16 and 17, the High Court shall have no jurisdiction to hear and try any civil proceedings involving matters which come within the jurisdiction of the Syariah Court under section 35(2)(a), (b) or (c) of the Administration of Muslim Law Act (Cap. 3) in which all the parties are Muslims or where the parties were married under the provisions of the Muslim law.
[20/99]
(2)  Notwithstanding that such matters come within the jurisdiction of the Syariah Court under section 35(2)(d) or (e), 51 or 52(3)(c) or (d) of the Administration of Muslim Law Act, the High Court shall have jurisdiction as is vested in it by any written law to hear and try any civil proceedings involving matters relating to —
(a)
maintenance for any wife or child;
(b)
custody of any child; and
(c)
disposition or division of property on divorce.
[20/99]
(3)  Where civil proceedings involving any matter referred to in subsection (2)(b) or (c) and involving parties who are Muslims or were married under the provisions of the Muslim law are commenced in the High Court, the High Court shall stay the civil proceedings —
(a)
involving any matter referred to in subsection (2)(b) or (c), if the civil proceedings are commenced on or after the commencement of proceedings for divorce in the Syariah Court or after the making of a decree or order for divorce by the Syariah Court or on or after the registration of any divorce under section 102 of the Administration of Muslim Law Act (Cap. 3) between the same parties, unless a Syariah Court commencement certificate in respect of the civil proceedings has been filed with the High Court;
(b)
involving any matter referred to in subsection (2)(b), if proceedings for divorce are commenced in the Syariah Court or a decree or order for divorce is made by the Syariah Court or a divorce is registered under section 102 of the Administration of Muslim Law Act between the same parties after the commencement of the civil proceedings, unless a Syariah Court continuation certificate in respect of the civil proceedings has been filed with the High Court.
[20/99]
(3A)  For the purposes of subsection (3), any reference to the registration of any divorce, or to a divorce that is registered, under section 102 of the Administration of Muslim Law Act shall be construed as a reference to the registration of a divorce or to a divorce that is registered under that section before the date of commencement of section 24 of the Administration of Muslim Law (Amendment) Act 2008.
[29/2008 wef 01/03/2009]
(4)  For the purposes of subsection (3), where the proceedings in the Syariah Court are commenced on the same day as the civil proceedings in the High Court, the proceedings in the Syariah Court shall be deemed to have been commenced before the civil proceedings.
[20/99]
(5)  Subsection (3)(a) shall not apply if the civil proceedings referred to therein are commenced in the High Court by the consent of the parties to the proceedings and the certificates of attendance of the parties issued under section 35A(7) of the Administration of Muslim Law Act have been filed in accordance with Family Justice Rules.
[20/99]
[Act 27 of 2014 wef 01/01/2015]
(6)  Subsection (3)(b) shall not apply if the civil proceedings referred to therein are continued by the consent of the parties to the proceedings and the certificates of attendance of the parties issued under section 35A(7) of the Administration of Muslim Law Act (Cap. 3) have been filed in accordance with Family Justice Rules.
[20/99]
[Act 27 of 2014 wef 01/01/2015]
(7)  For the avoidance of any doubt, the High Court, in exercising its jurisdiction or powers under subsection (2), shall apply the civil law.
[20/99]
(8)  Notwithstanding section 3(2) of the Women’s Charter (Cap. 353), section 112 of that Act shall apply to the High Court in the exercise of its jurisdiction or powers under subsection (2)(c).
[20/99]
(9)  In this section —
“Syariah Court” means the Syariah Court constituted under the Administration of Muslim Law Act;
“Syariah Court commencement certificate” means a commencement certificate issued by the Syariah Court under section 35A(4) of the Administration of Muslim Law Act;
“Syariah Court continuation certificate” means a continuation certificate issued by the Syariah Court under section 35A(4) of the Administration of Muslim Law Act.
[20/99]
Powers of High Court
18.
—(1)  The High Court shall have such powers as are vested in it by any written law for the time being in force in Singapore.
[16/93]
(2)  Without prejudice to the generality of subsection (1), the High Court shall have the powers set out in the First Schedule.
[16/93]
(3)  The powers referred to in subsection (2) shall be exercised in accordance with any written law, Rules of Court or Family Justice Rules relating to them.
[16/93]
Singapore International Commercial Court
Singapore International Commercial Court
18A.  There shall be a division of the High Court known as the Singapore International Commercial Court.
President of Singapore International Commercial Court
18B.
—(1)  The Chief Justice may appoint a Judge of Appeal, a Judge of the High Court, a Senior Judge of the Supreme Court or an International Judge of the Supreme Court to be the President of the Singapore International Commercial Court for such period as the Chief Justice may specify.
(2)  If no appointment is made under subsection (1), the Chief Justice shall be the President of the Singapore International Commercial Court.
Act to apply with modifications
18C.  Subject to sections 18D to 18M and 80(2A), the provisions of this Act shall apply to proceedings in the Singapore International Commercial Court as they apply to proceedings in the High Court exercising its original civil jurisdiction.
Jurisdiction of Singapore International Commercial Court
18D.  The Singapore International Commercial Court shall have jurisdiction to hear and try any action that satisfies all of the following conditions:
(a)
the action is international and commercial in nature;
(b)
the action is one that the High Court may hear and try in its original civil jurisdiction;
(c)
the action satisfies such other conditions as the Rules of Court may prescribe.
Pre-action certificate
18E.
—(1)  A party intending to bring an action in the Singapore International Commercial Court may apply for a certificate stating all or any of the following matters:
(a)
that the intended action is international and commercial in nature for the purposes of section 18D(a);
(b)
such other matters as the Rules of Court may prescribe.
(2)  An application under subsection (1) —
(a)
shall be made by an originating process or such other process as the Rules of Court may prescribe;
(b)
shall be determined by a Judge or the Registrar; and
(c)
may be determined summarily or otherwise in accordance with such procedure as the Rules of Court may prescribe.
(3)  A certificate issued under this section is conclusive as to the matters certified in such circumstances as the Rules of Court may prescribe.
Effect of jurisdiction agreement
18F.
—(1)  Subject to subsection (2), the parties to an agreement to submit to the jurisdiction of the Singapore International Commercial Court shall be considered to have agreed —
(a)
to submit to the exclusive jurisdiction of the Singapore International Commercial Court;
(b)
to carry out any judgment or order of the Singapore International Commercial Court without undue delay; and
(c)
to waive any recourse to any court or tribunal outside Singapore against any judgment or order of the Singapore International Commercial Court, and against the enforcement of such judgment or order, insofar as such recourse can be validly waived.
(2)  Subsection (1)(a), (b) and (c) applies only if there is no express provision to the contrary in the agreement.
Composition of Singapore International Commercial Court
18G.  Every proceeding in the Singapore International Commercial Court shall be heard and disposed of before a single Judge or 3 Judges.
Provisions where Singapore International Commercial Court comprises 3 Judges
18H.
—(1)  This section applies where a case in the Singapore International Commercial Court is heard before 3 Judges.
(2)  The Chief Justice shall appoint one of the Judges to preside.
(3)  The case shall be decided in accordance with the opinion of the majority of the Judges hearing the case.
(4)  Subject to subsection (5), a case shall be reheard if one or more of the Judges are unable to continue hearing the case for any reason.
(5)  Where one Judge is unable to continue hearing a case for any reason, the remaining 2 Judges may continue to hear and determine the case if the parties consent.
(6)  Where a case is heard by 2 Judges under subsection (5) —
(a)
if the 2 Judges have the same opinion, the case shall be determined according to their opinion; or
(b)
if the 2 Judges have different opinions on any claim, counterclaim or application, the claim, counterclaim or application, as the case may be, shall be dismissed.
Powers of Singapore International Commercial Court, generally
18I.
—(1)  The Singapore International Commercial Court may exercise such powers as the High Court may exercise in its original civil jurisdiction, except —
(a)
the power under paragraph 1 of the First Schedule; and
(b)
any power that must be exercised through the Family Division of the High Court.
(2)  The Singapore International Commercial Court shall exercise its powers in accordance with the Rules of Court, and any other written law, relating to that Court or those powers.
Transfer of cases
18J.
—(1)  The Singapore International Commercial Court may transfer a case commenced in that Court to the High Court in accordance with the Rules of Court.
(2)  The High Court may transfer a case commenced in that Court to the Singapore International Commercial Court in accordance with the Rules of Court.
(3)  Where a case is transferred under subsection (1) or (2) —
(a)
the court to which the case is transferred may permit any matter that has been adduced to remain in evidence, notwithstanding that different rules of evidence may apply in the court to which the case is transferred; and
(b)
the court transferring the case and the court to which the case is transferred may make any consequential order in accordance with the Rules of Court.
(4)  In this section, “High Court” does not include the Singapore International Commercial Court.
Rules of evidence in certain cases
18K.
—(1)  The Singapore International Commercial Court —
(a)
shall not be bound to apply any rule of evidence under Singapore law in such cases and to such extent as the Rules of Court may provide; and
(b)
may, in those cases, apply other rules of evidence (whether such rules are found under any foreign law or otherwise) in accordance with the Rules of Court.
(2)  In subsection (1), “rule of evidence” includes any rule of law relating to privilege, or to the taking of evidence.
Determination of foreign law on submissions
18L.
—(1)  The Singapore International Commercial Court may, in such cases as the Rules of Court may prescribe, order that any question of foreign law be determined on the basis of submissions instead of proof.
(2)  In determining any question of foreign law on the basis of submissions, the Singapore International Commercial Court may have regard to such matters as the Rules of Court may prescribe.
Representation by foreign lawyers
18M.  A party to a case in the Singapore International Commercial Court, or to an appeal from that Court, may in accordance with the Rules of Court be represented by a foreign lawyer who is registered in accordance with Part IVB of the Legal Profession Act (Cap. 161).
Appellate Jurisdiction of the High Court
Appellate criminal jurisdiction
19.  The appellate criminal jurisdiction of the High Court shall consist of —
(a)
the hearing of appeals from District Courts or Magistrates’ Courts before one or more Judges according to the provisions of the law for the time being in force relating to criminal procedure;
(b)
the hearing of points of law reserved by special cases submitted by a District Court or Magistrate’s Court before one or more Judges according to the provisions of the law for the time being in force relating to criminal procedure;
(c)
the hearing of appeals from Family Courts when exercising criminal jurisdiction; and
(d)
the hearing of appeals from Youth Courts.
Appellate civil jurisdiction
20.  The appellate civil jurisdiction of the High Court shall consist of —
(a)
the hearing of appeals from Family Courts when exercising jurisdiction of a quasi-criminal or civil nature;
(b)
the hearing of appeals from District Courts and Magistrates’ Courts when exercising jurisdiction of a quasi-criminal or civil nature; and
(c)
the hearing of appeals from other tribunals as may from time to time be prescribed by any written law.
[30/2010 wef 01/01/2011]
Appeals from District and Magistrates’ Courts
21.
—(1)  Subject to the provisions of this Act and any other written law, an appeal shall lie to the High Court from a decision of a District Court or Magistrate’s Court —
(a)
in any case where the amount in dispute, or the value of the subject-matter, at the hearing before that District Court or Magistrate’s Court (excluding interest and costs) exceeds $50,000 or such other amount as may be specified by an order made under subsection (3); or
(b)
with the leave of that District Court or Magistrate’s Court or the High Court, in any other case.
[30/2010 wef 01/01/2011]
(2)  Such appeals may be heard before one Judge provided that the Judge, if he thinks fit, may reserve any appeal for the decision of a court consisting of 3 Judges, and in such case the appeal shall be decided in accordance with the opinion of the majority of the Judges composing the High Court.
(2A)  An order of the High Court giving or refusing leave under subsection (1)(b) shall be final.
[30/2010 wef 01/01/2011]
(2B)  No appeal shall be brought to the High Court in any case where a District Court or Magistrate’s Court makes an order specified in the Third Schedule, except in such circumstances as may be specified in that Schedule.
[30/2010 wef 01/01/2011]
(3)  The President may, after consulting the Chief Justice, by order published in the Gazette, vary the amount mentioned in subsection (1).
[43/98]
Powers of rehearing
22.
—(1)  All appeals to the High Court in the exercise of its appellate civil jurisdiction shall be by way of rehearing.
(2)  The High Court shall have the like powers and jurisdiction on the hearing of such appeals as the Court of Appeal has on the hearing of appeals from the High Court.
Supervisory and Revisionary Jurisdiction
[30/2010 wef 01/01/2011]
Revision of criminal proceedings of subordinate courts
23.  The High Court may exercise powers of revision in respect of criminal proceedings and matters in subordinate courts in accordance with the provisions of any written law for the time being in force relating to criminal procedure.
Power of High Court to call for records of civil proceedings in subordinate courts
24.  The High Court may call for and examine the record of any civil proceedings before any subordinate court for the purpose of satisfying itself as to the correctness, legality or propriety of any decision recorded or passed, and as to the regularity of any proceedings of any such subordinate court.
Powers of High Court on revision of civil proceedings
25.  In the case of any civil proceedings in a subordinate court the record of which has been called for, or which otherwise comes to its knowledge, the High Court may give such orders thereon, either by directing a new trial or otherwise, as seem necessary to secure that substantial justice is done.
No revision at instance of party who could have appealed
26.  Where an appeal lies from any decision in any civil matter, and no appeal is brought, no proceeding by way of revision shall be entertained at the instance of a party who could have appealed.
General supervisory and revisionary jurisdiction of High Court
27.
—(1)  In addition to the powers conferred on the High Court by this Act or any other written law, the High Court shall have general supervisory and revisionary jurisdiction over all subordinate courts.
(2)  The High Court may in particular, but without prejudice to the generality of subsection (1), if it appears desirable in the interests of justice, either of its own motion or at the instance of any party or person interested, at any stage in any matter or proceeding, whether civil or criminal, in any subordinate court, call for the record thereof, and may remove the matter or proceeding into the High Court or may give to the subordinate court such directions as to the further conduct of the matter or proceeding as justice may require.
(3)  Upon the High Court calling for any record under subsection (2), all proceedings in the subordinate court in the matter or proceeding in question shall be stayed pending further order of the High Court.
(4)  The High Court shall, when exercising (or deciding whether to exercise) its supervisory and revisionary jurisdiction under subsection (1) or powers under subsection (2) in relation to any matter which concerns a case where the High Court has heard and determined an appeal from a subordinate court, have regard to whether that matter was, or could reasonably have been, raised in that appeal.
[30/2010 wef 01/01/2011]
Discretion of High Court as to hearing parties
28.
—(1)  Subject to the provisions of any written law for the time being in force, no party shall have any right to be heard before the High Court when exercising its powers of supervision and revision.
(2)  No final order shall be made to the prejudice of any person unless that person has had an opportunity of being so heard.
Allocation of Proceedings
Allocation of proceedings to District Court or Family Court
28A.
—(1)  The Chief Justice may, where he considers it necessary or expedient to improve efficiency in the administration of justice and to provide for more speedy disposal of proceedings commenced in the High Court, by order direct such class or classes or description of proceedings as may be specified in the order to be heard and determined by the District Court or Family Court.
[16/93]
(2)  Notwithstanding any other written law, any order under subsection (1) —
(a)
may confer jurisdiction on a District Court to hear and determine —
(i)
any proceedings specified in the order which, but for the order, the District Court would not have jurisdiction to hear and determine by reason only of the fact that the amount involved exceeds the monetary limit of its jurisdiction; or
(ii)
any proceedings relating to any of the matters referred to in section 17(b) or (c);
(aa)
may confer jurisdiction on a Family Court to hear and determine any proceedings specified in the order which, but for the order, the Family Court would not have jurisdiction to hear and determine;
(b)
may make such provision governing appeals relating to proceedings transferred to the District Court or Family Court (including provisions restricting the right of appeal) as the Chief Justice thinks fit; and
(c)
may make such incidental provision for the transfer of the proceedings to the District Court or Family Court (including matters relating to procedure and costs) as the Chief Justice thinks fit.
[16/93; 36/2004]
Further Arguments
[30/2010 wef 01/01/2011]
Further arguments before Judge exercising civil jurisdiction of High Court
28B.
—(1)  Before any notice of appeal is filed in respect of any judgment or order made by a Judge, in the exercise of the civil jurisdiction of the High Court, after any hearing other than a trial of an action, the Judge may hear further arguments in respect of the judgment or order, if any party to the hearing, or the Judge, requests for further arguments before the earlier of —
(a)
the time the judgment or order is extracted; or
(b)
the expiration of 14 days after the date the judgment or order is made.
[30/2010 wef 01/01/2011]
(2)  After hearing further arguments, the Judge may affirm, vary or set aside the judgment or order.
[30/2010 wef 01/01/2011]
(3)  If any request for further arguments has been made under subsection (1) —
(a)
no notice of appeal shall be filed in respect of the judgment or order until the Judge —
(i)
affirms, varies or sets aside the judgment or order after hearing further arguments; or
(ii)
certifies, or is deemed to have certified, that he requires no further arguments; and
(b)
the time for filing a notice of appeal in respect of the judgment or order shall begin on the date the Judge —
(i)
affirms, varies or sets aside the judgment or order after hearing further arguments; or
(ii)
certifies, or is deemed to have certified, that he requires no further arguments.
[30/2010 wef 01/01/2011]
(4)  For the avoidance of doubt, a party to the hearing may, but is not required to, request for further arguments before he files a notice of appeal in respect of the judgment or order.
[30/2010 wef 01/01/2011]
PART IV
THE COURT OF APPEAL
Constitution of Court of Appeal
29.
—(1)  The Court of Appeal shall consist of —
(a)
the Chief Justice; and
(b)
the Judges of Appeal.
[16/93]
(2)  The Chief Justice shall be the President of the Court of Appeal, and may appoint one or more of the Judges of Appeal as Vice‑Presidents of the Court of Appeal.
[16/93]
(3)  A Judge of the High Court, a Judicial Commissioner of the Supreme Court or a Senior Judge of the Supreme Court may, if the Chief Justice so requires, sit in the Court of Appeal.
(4)  An International Judge of the Supreme Court may, if the Chief Justice so requires, sit in the Court of Appeal in an appeal from any judgment or order of the Singapore International Commercial Court.
(5)  A person sitting in the Court of Appeal in accordance with subsection (3) or (4) shall have all the jurisdiction, powers and privileges of a Judge of Appeal sitting in the Court of Appeal.
(6)  The person who presides over a sitting of the Court of Appeal shall be determined as follows:
(a)
where the Court of Appeal includes one or more Judges of the Supreme Court specified in section 4, the person shall be determined according to the order of precedence prescribed in that section;
(b)
where the Court of Appeal does not include any Judge of the Supreme Court specified in section 4, the Chief Justice shall appoint a person to preside.
Jurisdiction of Court of Appeal
29A.
—(1)  The civil jurisdiction of the Court of Appeal shall consist of appeals from any judgment or order of the High Court in any civil cause or matter whether made in the exercise of its original or of its appellate jurisdiction, subject nevertheless to the provisions of this Act or any other written law regulating the terms and conditions upon which such appeals may be brought.
[16/93]
(2)  The criminal jurisdiction of the Court of Appeal shall consist of appeals against any decision made by the High Court in the exercise of its original criminal jurisdiction, subject nevertheless to the provisions of this Act or any other written law regulating the terms and conditions upon which such appeals may be brought.
[16/93]
(3)  For the purposes of and incidental to —
(a)
the hearing and determination of any appeal to the Court of Appeal; and
(b)
the amendment, execution and enforcement of any judgment or order made on such an appeal,
the Court of Appeal shall have all the authority and jurisdiction of the court or tribunal from which the appeal was brought.
[16/93]
(4)  The Court of Appeal shall, for the purposes of and subject to the provisions of this Act, have full power to determine any question necessary to be determined for the purpose of doing justice in any case before the Court.
[16/93]
Composition of Court of Appeal
30.
—(1)  The civil and criminal jurisdiction of the Court of Appeal shall be exercised by 3 or any greater uneven number of Judges of Appeal.
[16/93]
(2)  Notwithstanding subsection (1), the Court of Appeal in the exercise of its civil jurisdiction shall, if it consists of 2 Judges of Appeal, be duly constituted for the purpose of hearing and determining —
(a)
an application to extend the time for filing and serving a notice of appeal;
(b)
an application to discharge or vary any direction or order made under section 36(1);
(ba)
an application for leave to appeal to the Court of Appeal, whether under this Act or any other written law;
(c)
an appeal against an interlocutory judgment;
(ca)
an appeal against any judgment or order obtained after the hearing of an application for the admission of a person under section 15 of the Legal Profession Act (Cap. 161);
[Act 3 of 2012 wef 01/04/2012]
(d)
an appeal against any judgment or order obtained after the hearing of an assessment of damages;
(e)
an appeal against any judgment or order obtained after the hearing of a taking of accounts between parties; or
(f)
an appeal against any judgment or order obtained after any proceedings other than the trial or hearing of any action or matter commenced by any originating process.
[30/2010 wef 01/01/2011]
(3)  No Judge of Appeal shall sit as a member of the Court of Appeal on the hearing of, or shall determine any application in proceedings incidental or preliminary to —
(a)
an appeal from a judgment or an order made by him;
(b)
an appeal against a conviction before him or a sentence passed by him; or
(c)
the consideration of any case stated by him under section 395 of the Criminal Procedure Code 2010.
[16/93]
[15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
(3A)  No Judge of Appeal shall sit as a member of the Court of Appeal on the hearing of an application to discharge or vary any direction or order made by him under section 36(1).
[30/2010 wef 01/01/2011]
(4)  Section 10A shall apply in relation to proceedings before the Court of Appeal as it applies in relation to proceedings before the High Court.
[16/93]
Appeals how decided
31.
—(1)  Subject to subsection (2), any appeal or determination of any question before the Court of Appeal shall be decided in accordance with the opinion of the majority of the members of the Court hearing the case.
[16/93]
(2)  Where an appeal or application has been heard by the Court of Appeal consisting of 2 Judges of Appeal and the members of that Court are divided, the decision appealed against shall stand or the application shall be dismissed, as the case may be.
Sittings of Court of Appeal
32.
—(1)  The Court of Appeal shall sit on such dates (whether or not a Saturday, Sunday or public holiday or during a vacation prescribed under section 12) and at such places as the Chief Justice may from time to time appoint.
[8/98; 2/2007]
(2)  The Chief Justice may cancel or postpone any sitting of the Court of Appeal which has been appointed under subsection (1).
PART IVA
CIVIL JURISDICTION OF COURT OF APPEAL
Application of this Part
32A.  This Part relates to the Court of Appeal in the exercise of its civil jurisdiction.
[16/93]
Continuation of civil appeal notwithstanding absence of a Judge of Appeal
33.
—(1)  If, in the course of any appeal, or, in the case of a reserved judgment in any such appeal, at any time before delivery of the judgment, any Judge of Appeal of the Court hearing the appeal is unable, through illness or any other cause, to attend the proceedings or otherwise exercise his functions as a Judge of Appeal of such Court, the hearing of the appeal shall, if the parties consent, continue as before, and judgment or reserved judgment, as the case may be, shall be given by the remaining Judges of Appeal of such Court, not being less than 2, and that Court shall, for the purposes of that appeal, be deemed to be duly constituted notwithstanding the absence or inability to act of such Judge of Appeal.
[16/93]
(2)  In any such case as is referred to in subsection (1), the appeal shall be decided in accordance with the opinion of the majority of the remaining Judges of Appeal of such Court, and if there is no such majority, the decision appealed against shall stand.
[16/93]
(3)  If the parties do not consent as mentioned in subsection (1), the appeal shall be reheard.
Matters that are non-appealable or appealable only with leave
34.
—(1)  No appeal shall be brought to the Court of Appeal in any of the following cases:
(a)
where a Judge makes an order specified in the Fourth Schedule, except in such circumstances as may be specified in that Schedule;
[30/2010 wef 01/01/2011]
(b)
[Deleted by Act 30/2010 wef 01/01/2011]
(c)
[Deleted by Act 30/2010 wef 01/01/2011]
(d)
where the judgment or order is made by consent of the parties; or
(e)
where, by any written law for the time being in force, the judgment or order of the High Court is expressly declared to be final.
[16/93]
(2)  Except with the leave of the High Court or the Court of Appeal, no appeal shall be brought to the Court of Appeal in any of the following cases:
(a)
where the amount in dispute, or the value of the subject-matter, at the hearing before the High Court (excluding interest and costs) does not exceed $250,000 or such other amount as may be specified by an order made under subsection (3);
[30/2010 wef 01/01/2011]
(b)
where the only issue in the appeal relates to costs or fees for hearing dates;
(c)
where a Judge in chambers makes a decision in a summary way on an interpleader summons where the facts are not in dispute; or
[Act 27 of 2014 wef 01/01/2015]
(d)
where a Judge makes an order specified in the Fifth Schedule, except in such circumstances as may be specified in that Schedule.
[30/2010 wef 01/01/2011]
[Act 27 of 2014 wef 01/01/2015]
(e)
[Deleted by Act 27 of 2014 wef 01/01/2015]
(2A)  Subsection (2)(a) does not apply to any of the following cases:
(a)
any case heard and determined by the High Court in the exercise of its original jurisdiction under any written law which requires that case to be heard and determined by the High Court in the exercise of its original jurisdiction;
(b)
any case heard and determined by the Family Division of the High Court in the exercise of its original jurisdiction;
(c)
any family proceedings (not being probate proceedings) commenced in the High Court before 1 October 2014 and heard and determined by the High Court in the exercise of its original jurisdiction;
(d)
any contentious probate proceedings commenced in the High Court before 1 January 2015 and heard and determined by the High Court in the exercise of its original jurisdiction.
(3)  The President may, after consulting the Chief Justice, by order published in the Gazette vary the amount mentioned in subsection (2)(a).
[43/98]
(4)  Subsections (1) and (2) do not apply to any decision, judgment or order of the Family Division of the High Court involving the exercise of the appellate civil jurisdiction referred to in section 23 of the Family Justice Act 2014 (Act 27 of 2014).
(5)  Except with the leave of the Court of Appeal, or of a Judge of the Family Division of the High Court, no appeal shall be brought to the Court of Appeal from any decision, judgment or order of the Family Division of the High Court involving the exercise of the appellate civil jurisdiction referred to in section 23 of the Family Justice Act 2014.
(6)  Subsections (1) and (2) do not apply to any decision, judgment or order of the High Court involving the exercise of the appellate civil jurisdiction of the High Court in any of the following circumstances:
(a)
the hearing of any appeal from a District Court or Magistrate’s Court when exercising jurisdiction of a quasi-criminal or civil nature in any family proceedings (not being probate proceedings), being an appeal commenced in the High Court before 1 October 2014;
(b)
the hearing of any appeal or special case from the Tribunal for the Maintenance of Parents, being an appeal or a special case commenced in the High Court before 1 October 2014;
(c)
the hearing of any appeal from any contentious probate proceedings commenced in a District Court, being an appeal commenced in the High Court before 1 January 2015.
(7)  Except with the leave of the High Court or the Court of Appeal, no appeal shall be brought to the Court of Appeal from any decision, judgment or order of the High Court involving the exercise of the appellate civil jurisdiction of the High Court in any of the following circumstances:
(a)
the hearing of any appeal from a District Court or Magistrate’s Court when exercising jurisdiction of a quasi‑criminal or civil nature in any family proceedings (not being probate proceedings), being an appeal commenced in the High Court before 1 October 2014;
(b)
the hearing of any appeal or special case from the Tribunal for the Maintenance of Parents, being an appeal or a special case commenced in the High Court before 1 October 2014;
(c)
the hearing of any appeal from any contentious probate proceedings commenced in a District Court, being an appeal commenced in the High Court before 1 January 2015.
(8)  In this section —
“family proceedings” has the same meaning as in section 2(1) of the Family Justice Act 2014;
“probate proceedings” has the same meaning as in section 47(13) of the Family Justice Act 2014.
Court of Appeal may decide application for leave to appeal without hearing oral arguments
34A.  The Court of Appeal may, without hearing oral arguments, decide any application for leave to appeal to that Court, whether under this Act or any other written law.
Applications
35.  Wherever application may be made either to the High Court or to the Court of Appeal, it shall be made in the first instance to the High Court.
Incidental directions and interim orders
36.
—(1)  In any proceeding pending before the Court of Appeal, any direction incidental thereto not involving the decision of the appeal, any interim order to prevent prejudice to the claims of parties pending the appeal, and any order for security for costs and for the dismissal of an appeal for default in furnishing security so ordered, may at any time be made by a Judge.
(2)  Every application under subsection (1) shall be deemed to be a proceeding in the Court of Appeal.
(3)  Every direction or order so made may be discharged or varied by the Court of Appeal.
[30/2010 wef 01/01/2011]
Hearing of appeals
37.
—(1)  Appeals to the Court of Appeal shall be by way of rehearing.
(2)  In relation to such appeals, the Court of Appeal shall have all the powers and duties, as to amendment or otherwise, of the High Court, together with full discretionary power to receive further evidence by oral examination in court, by affidavit, or by deposition taken before an examiner or a commissioner.
(3)  Such further evidence may be given without leave on interlocutory applications, or in any case as to matters which have occurred after the date of the decision from which the appeal is brought.
(4)  Upon appeals from a judgment, after trial or hearing of any cause or matter upon the merits, such further evidence, except as to matters subsequent as specified in subsection (3), shall be admitted on special grounds only, and not without leave of the Court of Appeal.
(5)  The Court of Appeal may draw inferences of facts, and give any judgment, and make any order which ought to have been given or made, and make such further or other orders as the case requires.
(6)  The powers in this section may be exercised notwithstanding that the notice of appeal relates only to part of the decision, and such powers may also be exercised in favour of all or any of the respondents or parties, although the respondents or parties have not appealed from or complained of the decision.
Costs of appeal
38.  The Court of Appeal may make such order as to the whole or any part of the costs of appeal or in the court below as is just.
New trial
39.
—(1)  Except as is provided in this Act, the Court of Appeal shall have power to order that a new trial be had of any cause or matter tried by the High Court in the exercise of its original or appellate jurisdiction.
(2)  A new trial shall not be granted on the ground of improper admission or rejection of evidence unless in the opinion of the Court of Appeal some substantial wrong or miscarriage of justice has been thereby occasioned.
(3)  If it appears to the Court of Appeal that such wrong or miscarriage of justice affects only part of the matters in controversy, or some or only one of the parties, the Court of Appeal may give final judgment as to part thereof, or as to some or only one of the parties, and direct a new trial as to the other part only, or as to the other party or parties.
(4)  A new trial may be ordered on any question without interfering with the finding or decision of the High Court upon any other question.
Immaterial errors
40.  No judgment or order of the High Court, or of any Judge, shall be reversed or substantially varied on appeal, nor a new trial ordered by the Court of Appeal, on account of any error, defect or irregularity, whether in the decision or otherwise, not affecting the merits, or the jurisdiction of the Court.
Appeal not to operate as stay of execution
41.
—(1)  An appeal shall not operate as a stay of execution or of proceedings under the decision appealed from unless the court below or the Court of Appeal so orders.
(2)  No intermediate act or proceeding shall be invalidated except so far as the Court of Appeal may direct.
PART V
42.  [Repealed by Act 15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
43.  [Repealed by Act 15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
44.  [Repealed by Act 15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
45.  [Repealed by Act 15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
46.  [Repealed by Act 15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
47.  [Repealed by Act 15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
48.  [Repealed by Act 15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
49.  [Repealed by Act 15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
50.  [Repealed by Act 15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
51.  [Repealed by Act 15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
52.  [Repealed by Act 15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
53.  [Repealed by Act 15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
54.  [Repealed by Act 15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
55.  [Repealed by Act 15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
56.  [Repealed by Act 15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
57.  [Repealed by Act 15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
58.  [Repealed by Act 15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
59.  [Repealed by Act 15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
60.  [Repealed by Act 15/2010 wef 02/01/2011]
PART VI
OFFICERS AND OFFICES
Registrar
Appointment of Registrar, Deputy Registrar and Assistant Registrars
61.
—(1)  The President may, on the recommendation of the Chief Justice, appoint a Registrar, a Deputy Registrar and Assistant Registrars of the Supreme Court.
[58/73]
(2)  No person shall be appointed to be or to act as the Registrar, the Deputy Registrar or an Assistant Registrar unless he is a qualified person as defined in section 2 of the Legal Profession Act (Cap. 161).
[58/73]
Powers and duties of Registrar, Deputy Registrar and Assistant Registrars
62.
—(1)  The Registrar, the Deputy Registrar and the Assistant Registrars shall, subject to the provisions of this Act or any other written law, have such jurisdiction, powers and duties as may be prescribed by Rules of Court.
[58/73; 7/97]
(2)  Subject to Rules of Court, all the powers and duties conferred and imposed on the Registrar may be exercised or performed by the Deputy Registrar or the Assistant Registrars.
[58/73]
Sheriff
Sheriff, Deputy Sheriff and Assistant Sheriffs of Supreme Court
63.
—(1)  The Registrar shall be the Sheriff and the Deputy Registrar shall be the Deputy Sheriff and the Assistant Registrars shall be the Assistant Sheriffs of the Supreme Court.
[58/73]
(2)  The Deputy Sheriff and the Assistant Sheriffs shall have all the powers and privileges and may perform all the duties of the Sheriff.
[58/73]
Powers and duties of Sheriff
64.
—(1)  The Sheriff or his officers shall —
(a)
execute all writs, summonses, rules, orders, warrants, commands and process of the Supreme Court given to him by the Court for that purpose;
(b)
make a return of the same together with the manner of the execution thereof to the Supreme Court from which the process issued; and
(c)
receive all such persons as are committed to his custody by the Supreme Court.
(2)  The Sheriff or his officers in executing any writ of seizure and sale or any other writ of execution or of distress may effect an entry into any building, and for that purpose if necessary may break open any outer or inner door or window of the building or any receptacle therein, using such force as is reasonably necessary to effect an entry.
Sheriff not to act when an interested party
65.  Where in any cause or matter the Sheriff is an interested party, the court may appoint for that purpose an officer or a person who may act in the place of the Sheriff.
Solicitor authorised to act as officer of Sheriff
65A.
—(1)  Subject to such directions as may be given by the Chief Justice, the Registrar may authorise a solicitor or a person employed by a solicitor to exercise the powers and perform the duties of an officer of the Sheriff during such period or on such occasion as the Registrar thinks fit and subject to such terms and conditions as the Registrar may determine.
[16/93]
(2)  Section 79(2) shall apply to a solicitor or person authorised under subsection (1) as it applies to an officer of the Supreme Court.
[16/93]
Accountant
Accountant — his duties
66.
—(1)  An Accountant shall be appointed by the Chief Justice for the Supreme Court.
(2)  Such Accountant shall do all things necessary to execute the orders of the Supreme Court relating to the payment or delivery or depositing of suitors’ money, jewels, precious stones and securities into or in his custody, and investing the money of suitors and keeping the accounts thereof.
Subordinate officers
Subordinate officers of Supreme Court
67.
—(1)  There shall be attached to the Supreme Court commissioners for oaths, interpreters, clerks, process servers and other officers as shall, from time to time, appear to the Chief Justice to be necessary for the administration of justice and the due execution of all powers and duties which are vested in the Supreme Court.
(2)  Such of the officers attached to the Supreme Court as may be thought necessary or proper for the performance of any special duties in connection with any particular Judge may, with the approval of the Chief Justice, be attached to that Judge.
Commissioners for oaths
68.
—(1)  The Registrar, the Deputy Registrar and the Assistant Registrars shall be ex-officio commissioners for oaths.
[58/73]
(2)  The Senate of the Singapore Academy of Law may appoint fit and proper persons to be commissioners for oaths (subject to any limitations expressed in their appointment) who may do all or any of the following things:
(a)
receive acknowledgements of married women in all cases where such acknowledgements are required by law to be taken before a public officer;
(b)
receive acknowledgements of recognisances of bail and bail bonds;
(c)
administer oaths for —
(i)
the justification for bail;
(ii)
taking any affidavit or affirmation;
(iii)
receiving and taking the answer, plea, demurrer, disclaimer, allegation or examination of any party or parties to any action;
(iv)
the examination of any witnesses upon any interrogatories or de bene esse or in chief or on any other occasions;
(v)
swearing executors and administrators; and
(vi)
swearing persons in any cause or matter which is pending or about to be instituted in any court in any of its jurisdiction;
(d)
take and receive statutory declarations.
[34/95]
(3)  The Senate of the Singapore Academy of Law may make rules for the appointment and conduct of, fees to be charged by, fees payable to the Singapore Academy of Law by, and for all things appertaining to, commissioners for oaths and persons appointed by the Senate under subsection (2).
[34/95]
Oaths of officers
69.  The Registrar, the Deputy Registrar, the Assistant Registrars and such other officers of the Supreme Court as may be required by the Chief Justice shall, before exercising the functions of their respective offices, take and subscribe the appropriate oath of office set out in the Second Schedule.
[58/73; 16/93]
Apportionment of work
70.  The Chief Justice may make such rules and regulations as he thinks fit for the apportionment of the work among the several officers of the Supreme Court.
Offices
Registry of Supreme Court
71.
—(1)  There shall be an office of the Supreme Court called the Registry comprising such departments as the Chief Justice may, from time to time, determine.
(2)  The Registry shall be under the control and supervision of the Registrar.
Registry to be open throughout the year
72.
—(1)  The Registry of the Supreme Court shall be open on every day of the year except on Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays.
[8/98; 2/2007]
(2)  Notwithstanding subsection (1), the Registrar may lawfully sit or carry out the business of the Registry on a Saturday, Sunday or public holiday if —
(a)
the Chief Justice has directed the Registrar to do so on that day; or
(b)
in the opinion of the Registrar, the business to be despatched is extremely urgent.
[8/98; 2/2007]
(3)  The office hours of the Registry shall be such times as the Chief Justice may from time to time direct.
[8/98]
PART VII
MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS
List of Touts
List of touts
73.
—(1)  The Registrar may publish a list of persons proved to his satisfaction, by evidence of general repute or otherwise, to act as touts or unauthorised advisers to suitors or other persons having business with or before any officer of the Supreme Court, and may alter and amend such list.
(2)  The Registrar may, by general or special order, exclude from the precincts of the Supreme Court any person whose name is included in the list, except when that person is a party to or a witness in any proceedings in the Supreme Court, when he shall be allowed to remain for such time as is necessary.
(3)  No person’s name shall be included in the list until he has been heard or had an opportunity of being heard against such inclusion.
(4)  An appeal shall lie to a Judge in chambers from an order made by the Registrar to include a person’s name in the list.