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Contents  

Long Title

Enacting Formula

Part I PRELIMINARY

Part II CRIMINAL JURISDICTION OF SUBORDINATE COURTS

Part III POWERS OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL AND PUBLIC PROSECUTOR

Part IV INFORMATION TO POLICE AND POWERS OF INVESTIGATION

Division 1 — Duties of police officer on receiving information about offences

Division 2 — Search and seizure

Part V PREVENTION OF OFFENCES

Division 1 — Security for keeping peace and for good behaviour

Division 2 — Proceedings following order to provide security

Division 3 — Unlawful assemblies

Division 4 — Preventive action of police

Part VI ARREST AND BAIL AND PROCESSES TO COMPEL APPEARANCE

Division 1 — Arrest without warrant

Division 2 — Arrest with warrant

Division 3 — General provisions for arrests with or without warrant

Division 4 — Proclamation and attachment

Division 5 — Bails and bonds

Division 6 — Notice to attend court and bonds to appear in court

Division 7 — Surrender of travel document and requirement to remain in Singapore

Division 8 — Summons to appear in court

Part VII THE CHARGE

Part VIII INITIATION OF CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS AND COMPLAINT TO MAGISTRATE

Part IX PRE-TRIAL PROCEDURES IN THE SUBORDINATE COURTS

Division 1 — General matters

Division 2 — Criminal case disclosure procedures

Division 3 — Non-compliance with Division 2

Division 4 — Where criminal case disclosure procedures do not apply

Part X PRE-TRIAL PROCEDURES IN HIGH COURT

Division 1 — General matters

Division 2 — Committal procedures for cases triable by High Court

Division 3 — Supplementary provisions to committal procedures

Division 4 — Non-compliance with certain requirements in Division 2

Division 5 — Transmission proceedings

Division 6 — Non-compliance with certain requirements in Division 5

Part XI GENERAL PROVISIONS RELATING TO PRE-TRIAL AND PLEAD GUILTY PROCEDURES IN ALL COURTS

Division 1 — General pre-trial procedures

Division 2 — When accused pleads guilty electronically

Division 3 — Plead guilty procedures

Part XII PROCEDURE AT TRIAL IN ALL COURTS

Part XIII GENERAL PROVISIONS RELATING TO PROCEEDINGS IN COURTS

Division 1 — General provisions

Division 2 — Transfer of cases

Division 3 — Compounding of offences

Division 4 — Previous acquittals or convictions

Division 5 — Proceedings relating to persons of unsound mind

Part XIV EVIDENCE AND WITNESSES

Division 1 — Preliminary

Division 2 — Admissibility of certain types of evidence

Division 3 — Ancillary hearing

Division 4 — Special provisions relating to recording of evidence

Division 5 — Witnesses

Part XV JUDGMENT

Part XVI SENTENCES

Division 1 — Sentences in general

Division 2 — Sentence of caning

Division 3 — Suspensions, remissions and commutations of sentences

Part XVII COMMUNITY SENTENCES

Part XVIII COMPENSATION AND COSTS

Part XIX DISPOSAL OF PROPERTY

Part XX APPEALS, POINTS RESERVED, REVISIONS AND CRIMINAL MOTIONS

Division 1 — Appeals

Division 2 — Points reserved

Division 3 — Revision of proceedings before Subordinate Courts

Division 4 — Revision of orders made at criminal case disclosure conference

Division 5 — Criminal motions

Part XXI SPECIAL PROCEEDINGS

Division 1 — Proceedings in case of certain offences affecting administration of justice

Division 2 — Special proceedings — Order for review of detention

Part XXII MISCELLANEOUS

FIRST SCHEDULE Tabular Statement of Offences under the Penal Code

SECOND SCHEDULE Laws to Which Criminal Case Disclosure Procedures Apply

THIRD SCHEDULE Offences to Which Transmission Procedures Apply

FOURTH SCHEDULE Offences That May be Compounded by Victim

FIFTH SCHEDULE Types of Work

SIXTH SCHEDULE Consequential and Related Amendments to Other Written Laws

 
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PART IV
INFORMATION TO POLICE AND POWERS OF INVESTIGATION
Division 1 — Duties of police officer
on receiving information about offences
Information about offences received by police
14.
—(1)  When information is first received at a police station about an offence, the recording officer must proceed in accordance with this section.
(2)  If the information is in writing, the recording officer must —
(a)
if practicable, immediately mark on it the date and time of receipt at the police station and the name and address of the person who gave the information; and
(b)
if the information appears to be signed by the informant, file it as a report.
(3)  If the information is given orally and the recording officer considers it practicable to reduce it to writing immediately, he must ensure that all of the following are recorded in a report:
(a)
the date and time of his receipt of the information;
(b)
the name and address of the informant;
(c)
the information given by the informant;
(d)
such other particulars as the nature of the case may require.
(4)  The informant, the recording officer and the interpreter (if any) must, where practicable, sign the report referred to in subsection (3).
(5)  If the information is given orally and it is impracticable for the recording officer to write it down immediately, he must —
(a)
make a note of the first information; and
(b)
if the offence to which the information relates is an arrestable offence, cause to be recorded, as soon as possible, a fuller statement from the informant under section 22.
(6)  If requested, the recording officer must give a copy of the information recorded under this section to the informant upon payment of the prescribed fee.
(7)  The Minister charged with the responsibility for home affairs may prescribe the mode by which information about an offence may be received or given under this section and section 15.
(8)  In this section, “recording officer” means the officer in charge of a police station or any police officer whose duty includes receiving reports relating to the commission of any offence.
Information about offences received by authorised persons
15.
—(1)  When information about an offence is given to any authorised person —
(a)
that person shall immediately record the information in a report and communicate that report to the officer in charge of a police station or any police officer whose duty includes dealing with reports relating to the commission of any offence; and
(b)
that officer must then proceed in accordance with section 16 or 17.
(2)  If requested, the officer referred to in subsection (1) must give a copy of the information recorded under this section to the informant upon payment of the prescribed fee.
(3)  In this section, “authorised person” means any person, not being a police officer, who is authorised by the Commissioner of Police to receive reports relating to the commission of any offence.
Procedure in non-arrestable cases
16.
—(1)  Where the information so filed or recorded under section 14 or 15 relates to a non-arrestable offence —
(a)
the case shall thereupon be investigated by a police officer;
(b)
the informant shall, by order of a police officer, be referred to a Magistrate; or
(c)
a police officer may refer the case to a mediator of a Community Mediation Centre, established under the Community Mediation Centres Act (Cap. 49A), for mediation.
(2)  In investigating such a case, a police officer may, by order of the Public Prosecutor or a Magistrate, exercise any of the special powers of investigation under sections 21, 22, 34, 39 and 111.
(3)  A police officer receiving an order of the Public Prosecutor or a Magistrate as referred to in subsection (2) may also exercise the same powers in respect of the investigation as he may exercise without an order in an arrestable case, except the power to arrest without warrant.
(4)  Any informant referred to a Magistrate under subsection (1) shall be supplied with a copy of any report filed or recorded under section 14 or 15 on which shall be endorsed the name of the police station or place at which the information was so filed or recorded.
(5)  A police officer must record his reasons if he decides not to investigate into any non-arrestable case.
Procedure when arrestable offence is suspected
17.
—(1)  If, from information received or otherwise, a police officer has reason to suspect that an arrestable offence has been committed at any place, the police officer must, or if he is unable to attend to the case, another police officer acting in his place must —
(a)
go as soon as practicable to the place to investigate the facts and circumstances of the case; and
(b)
try to find the offender and, if appropriate, arrest the offender and report the case to the Public Prosecutor.
(2)  Notwithstanding subsection (1) —
(a)
if the police officer has reason to believe that the case is not of a serious nature, there shall be no need to go to the place to investigate the facts and circumstances of the case; or
(b)
if the police officer has reason to believe that there are insufficient grounds for proceeding with the matter, he shall not do so.
(3)  In each of the cases mentioned in subsection (2)(a) and (b), the police officer receiving the information shall state in his report his reason for not fully complying with subsection (1).
Investigation in arrestable cases
18.
—(1)  A police officer may exercise all or any of the special powers of investigation under sections 21, 22, 34, 39 and 111 when investigating any arrestable case.
(2)  The action of a police officer in such a case may not be called into question at any time on the ground that he lacked authority under this section to exercise the special powers of investigation under sections 21, 22, 34, 39 and 111.
Diary of proceedings in investigation
19.
—(1)  A police officer conducting any investigation under this Part must keep a daily diary of his progress, setting out —
(a)
the time at which any order for investigation reached him;
(b)
the times at which he began and closed his investigation;
(c)
the places he visited; and
(d)
the findings of his investigation.
(2)  Notwithstanding anything in the Evidence Act (Cap. 97), an accused is not entitled to call for or inspect such a diary before or during an inquiry, trial or other proceeding under this Code.
(3)  Where, for the purposes of section 161 or 162 of the Evidence Act, the police officer conducting the investigation refers to such a diary, then —
(a)
the accused may be shown only the entries in the diary that the officer or prosecutor has referred to; and
(b)
the prosecutor must conceal or obliterate any other entries.
Power to order production of any document or other thing
20.
—(1)  Where a police officer of or above the rank of sergeant considers that a document or other thing (other than a document or thing in the custody of a Postal Authority or public postal licensee) is necessary or desirable for any investigation, inquiry, trial or other proceeding under this Code, he may issue a written order to the person in whose possession or power the document or thing is believed to be, to require that person —
(a)
to produce the document or thing at the time and place stated in the order; or
(b)
to give a police officer access to such document or thing.
(2)  Notwithstanding subsection (1), a written order under that subsection for the production of customer information by a financial institution, or access to customer information kept by a financial institution —
(a)
must only be made by a police officer of or above the rank of inspector; and
(b)
may require the financial institution to monitor any account of a customer of the financial institution for a period of time and provide such information relating to the transactions carried out in the account during that period.
(3)  If any document or thing in the custody of a Postal Authority or a public postal licensee is, in the opinion of the Public Prosecutor, required for any investigation, inquiry, trial or other proceeding under this Code, he may require the Postal Authority or public postal licensee to deliver that document or thing to the person whom the Public Prosecutor so requires it to be delivered.
(4)  If a person is required merely to produce any document or thing, he may comply with such requirement by causing the document or thing to be produced instead of bringing it in person.
(5)  A police officer may exercise the powers conferred under this section notwithstanding any provision in any other law relating to the production of, or the giving of any access to, any document or thing.
(6)  In this section, “customer information” has the same meaning as in section 40A of the Banking Act (Cap. 19).
Power to require attendance of witnesses
21.
—(1)  In conducting an investigation under this Part, a police officer may issue a written order requiring anyone within the limits of Singapore, who appears to be acquainted with any of the facts and circumstances of the case, to attend before him, and that person must attend as required.
(2)  If that person fails to attend as required, the police officer may report the matter to a Magistrate who may then, in his discretion, issue a warrant ordering the person to attend.
Power to examine witnesses
22.
—(1)  In conducting an investigation under this Part, a police officer may examine orally any person who appears to be acquainted with any of the facts and circumstances of the case —
(a)
whether before or after that person or anyone else is charged with an offence in connection with the case; and
(b)
whether or not that person is to be called as a witness in any inquiry, trial, or other proceeding under this Code in connection with the case.
(2)  The person examined shall be bound to state truly what he knows of the facts and circumstances of the case, except that he need not say anything that might expose him to a criminal charge, penalty or forfeiture.
(3)  A statement made by any person examined under this section must —
(a)
be in writing;
(b)
be read over to him;
(c)
if he does not understand English, be interpreted for him in a language that he understands; and
(d)
be signed by him.
Cautioned statements
23.
—(1)  If, during an investigation, a person (referred to in this section as the accused) is charged with an offence or informed by a police officer or any other person charged with the duty of investigating offences or charging offenders that he may be prosecuted for an offence, he must be served with and have read to him a notice in writing as follows:
You have been charged with [or informed that you may be prosecuted for] —
(set out the charge).
Do you want to say anything about the charge that was just read to you? If you keep quiet now about any fact or matter in your defence and you reveal this fact or matter in your defence only at your trial, the judge may be less likely to believe you. This may have a bad effect on your case in court. Therefore it may be better for you to mention such fact or matter now. If you wish to do so, what you say will be written down, read back to you for any mistakes to be corrected and then signed by you.”.
(2)  If an accused, after the notice under subsection (1) is read to him —
(a)
remains silent; or
(b)
says or does anything which intimates his refusal to give a statement,
the fact of his remaining silent or his refusal to give a statement or his other action must be recorded.
(3)  A statement made by an accused after the notice under subsection (1) is read to him must —
(a)
be in writing;
(b)
be read over to him;
(c)
if he does not understand English, be interpreted for him in a language that he understands; and
(d)
be signed by him.
(4)  No statement made by an accused in answer to a notice read to him under subsection (1) shall be construed as a statement caused by any threat, inducement or promise as is described in section 258(3), if it is otherwise voluntary.
(5)  A copy of a statement recorded under this section must be given to the accused at the end of the recording of such statement.
Division 2 — Search and seizure
When search warrant may be issued
24.
—(1)  A court may issue a search warrant if —
(a)
the court has reason to believe that a person who has been or may be issued an order under section 20(1), or a requisition under section 20(3), or a summons under section 235(1), would not produce the document or other thing as required by the order, requisition or summons;
(b)
it is not known who possesses that document or thing; or
(c)
the court considers that a general or specific search or inspection will serve the purposes of justice or of any investigation, inquiry, trial or other proceeding under this Code.
(2)  Nothing in this section shall authorise any court other than the High Court to grant a warrant to search for a document in the custody of the Postal Authority or a public postal licensee.
Search of house suspected to contain stolen property, forged documents, etc.
25.  If a court, upon information and after such inquiry as it thinks necessary, has reason to believe that any place is used —
(a)
for the deposit or sale of stolen property or of property unlawfully obtained or of goods in respect of which an offence has been committed under section 4, 5 or 6 of the Consumer Protection (Trade Descriptions and Safety Requirements) Act (Cap. 53);
(b)
for the deposit or sale or manufacture of any forged document, false seal, counterfeit stamp or coin, or any instrument or material for counterfeiting any coin or stamp or for forging; or
(c)
for the concealing, keeping or depositing of any stolen property or property unlawfully obtained, forged document, false seal, counterfeit stamp or coin, or any instrument or material used for counterfeiting any coin or stamp or for forging,
the court may by warrant authorise the person or persons to whom it is issued —
(i)
to enter that place with such assistance as may be required;
(ii)
to search it in the manner, if any, specified in the warrant;
(iii)
to take possession of any goods, property, document, seal, stamp or coin found in it which he reasonably suspects to be the subject of an offence committed under section 4, 5 or 6 of the Consumer Protection (Trade Descriptions and Safety Requirements) Act (Cap. 53) or to be stolen, unlawfully obtained, forged, false or counterfeit, and also of any such instrument and material as aforesaid;
(iv)
to convey any such goods, property, document, seal, stamp, coin, instrument or material before a Magistrate’s Court, or to guard the same on the spot until the offender is taken before a Magistrate’s Court, or to otherwise to dispose thereof in some place of safety; and
(v)
to take into custody and produce before a Magistrate’s Court every person found in that place who appears to have been privy to the deposit, sale or manufacture or keeping of any such goods, property, document, seal, stamp, coin, instrument or material knowing or having reasonable cause to suspect —
(A)
the goods to have been the subject of an offence committed under section 4, 5 or 6 of the Consumer Protection (Trade Descriptions and Safety Requirements) Act;
(B)
the property to have been stolen or otherwise unlawfully obtained;
(C)
the document, seal, stamp or coin to have been forged, falsified or counterfeited; or
(D)
the instrument or material to have been or to be intended to be used for counterfeiting any coin or stamp or for forging.
Form of search warrant
26.
—(1)  A search warrant issued by a court under this Code must be in writing bearing the seal of the court, and signed by a Magistrate or District Judge, as the case may be, or in the case of the High Court, by a Judge of the High Court or by the Registrar of the Supreme Court.
(2)  A search warrant must ordinarily be issued to the Commissioner of Police and to one or more other police officers to be designated by name in the warrant, and all or any of those police officers may execute it.
(3)  The court may in appropriate circumstances issue a search warrant to one or more named persons who are not police officers, and all or any of those persons may execute it.
(4)  The court may, if it thinks fit, specify in a search warrant the particular place or part of it to be searched or inspected, and the person charged with executing the warrant must then search or inspect only the specified place or part thereof.
(5)  A search warrant is subject to such conditions as may be specified by the court and shall remain in force for the number of days stated in the warrant.
Revocation of licence
27.
—(1)  Subject to subsection (3), the Board may by order revoke any licence it granted to a corporation or partnership if in the opinion of the Board —
(a)
the corporation or partnership has contravened or failed to comply with any of the conditions imposed by the Board under section 18;
(b)
the memorandum or articles of association of the corporation have been so altered that they no longer include the restrictions, limitations or prohibitions of the kind specified in section 17(1), (2) or (4), whichever is applicable;
(c)
a person who is neither a registered surveyor who has in force a practising certificate nor an allied professional has a beneficial interest in the capital assets and profits of the partnership;
(d)
the licence had been obtained by fraud or misrepresentation;
(e)
the corporation or partnership has ceased to supply title survey services in Singapore;
(f)
the corporation or partnership has contravened or failed to comply with section 19, 20 or 21, or has been convicted of an offence under this Act;
(g)
the corporation or partnership has contravened any provision of the prescribed code of professional conduct and ethics;
(h)
the conduct of any director, manager or employee of the corporation, or any partner or employee of the partnership, affords grounds for believing that the corporation or partnership, as the case may be, will not engage in title survey work in Singapore in accordance with the written law and with honesty and integrity;
(i)
the corporation or partnership has refused or failed to comply with an order of the Board made under subsection (2); or
(j)
the corporation or partnership refuses or fails to pay the cost of any correction to its title survey within 14 days of the receipt of a statement issued to it under section 36(4).
(2)  The Board may, in any case in which it considers that no cause of sufficient gravity for revoking a licence exists —
(a)
by order impose on the corporation or partnership concerned a penalty not exceeding $20,000 and every such penalty shall be recoverable as a debt due to the Board; or
(b)
order the corporation or partnership to pay the cost of any correction to its title survey incurred by the Chief Surveyor.
(3)  The Board shall not exercise its powers under subsection (1) or (2) unless —
(a)
an opportunity of being heard by a representative in writing or by counsel had been given to the corporation or partnership against whom the Board intends to exercise its powers; and
(b)
at least 3 members of the Board are present at the hearing.
(4)  Where the Board has revoked a licence pursuant to this section, it shall forthwith inform the corporation or partnership concerned.
(5)  Any order of revocation made by the Board shall not take effect until the expiration of 30 days after the Board has informed the corporation or partnership concerned and if within that period the corporation or partnership gives due notice of appeal to the High Court, the order shall not take effect unless the order is confirmed by the Court or the appeal is for any reason dismissed by the Court.
(6)  Where an order of revocation becomes effective —
(a)
the Registrar shall cause notice of the revocation to be published in the Gazette and shall cancel the entry in the register of licensees relating to the corporation or partnership concerned; and
(b)
the corporation or partnership concerned shall, as from the date of the notice, cease to supply title survey services in Singapore except as may be approved by the Board for the purpose of winding up its business.
(7)  Subsection (6) (b) shall not prejudice the enforcement by any person of any right or claim against the corporation or partnership or by the corporation or partnership of any right or claim against any person.
Appeals
28.  If the Board has made —
(a)
an order of cancellation of registration or suspension from practice under section 25 against a registered surveyor;
(b)
an order of revocation of a licence under section 27 against a corporation or partnership; or
(c)
an order imposing any pecuniary penalty on a registered surveyor under section 25(2) or on a licensed corporation or partnership under section 27(2),
the surveyor, corporation or partnership concerned may, within 30 days after the order or penalty has been communicated to him or them, appeal to the High Court whose decision shall be final.
Reinstatement of registration
29.  The Board may in its discretion, after the expiration of not less than one year from the cancellation of registration of any person, consider any application for registration by that person in accordance with the provisions of Part IV.
Powers of Investigation Committee and Board to require attendance of witnesses, etc
30.
—(1)  For the purposes of any investigation by an Investigation Committee or any hearing under section 25 or 27 by the Board, the Investigation Committee or the Board may —
(a)
require evidence to be given on oath and for that purpose the Chairman of the Investigation Committee or any member of the Board, as the case may be, may administer an oath; and
(b)
require any person to attend and give evidence before it and to produce all books, documents and papers in the custody of that person or under his control relating to the subject-matter of the investigation or hearing.
(2)  Every person who without lawful excuse refuses or fails —
(a)
to attend and give evidence when required to do so by the Investigation Committee or the Board;
(b)
to answer truly and fully any question put to him by a member of the Investigation Committee or the Board; or
(c)
to produce to the Investigation Committee or the Board any book, document or paper required of him,
shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding $2,000.
Person in charge of closed place to allow search
31.
—(1)  Where a police officer or other person executing any search under this Division demands entry or access to a place liable to search under this Division, the occupier or any person in charge of the place must allow him free entry or access and provide all reasonable facilities for a search in it.
(2)  If free entry or access to that place cannot be obtained under subsection (1), it shall be lawful in any case for the police officer or other person executing the search warrant to break open any outer or inner door or window of any place or to use any other reasonable means in order to gain entry or access into the place.
Search without warrant for stolen property
32.
—(1)  If information is given to any police officer of or above the rank of sergeant that there is reasonable cause for suspecting that any stolen property is concealed or lodged in any place and he has good grounds for believing that by reason of the delay in obtaining a search warrant such property is likely to be removed, he may search for the property alleged to have been stolen in the place specified without a search warrant.
(2)  A list of all the articles found upon a search conducted under subsection (1) and alleged to have been stolen or missing shall be delivered or taken down in writing with a declaration stating that an offence of theft, extortion, robbery, criminal misappropriation, criminal breach of trust or cheating has been committed and that the informant has good grounds for believing that the property is deposited in that place.
(3)  The person who lost the property or his representative shall accompany the officer in the search for that property under subsection (1) unless that person or his representative cannot be found without unreasonable delay.
Summary search
33.
—(1)  The Commissioner of Police may authorise any police officer in writing to enter any place in the circumstances mentioned in subsection (2) to search, seize and secure any property which the police officer believes to have been stolen as if the police officer had a search warrant for the property seized.
(2)  The circumstances referred to in subsection (1) are —
(a)
when the place to be searched is, or has in the 12 months preceding the search been, occupied or used by any person who has been convicted of the offence of receiving stolen property or of harbouring thieves; or
(b)
when the place to be searched is occupied or used by any person who has been convicted of any offence involving fraud or dishonesty punishable with imprisonment.
(3)  In authorising any police officer under subsection (1), it is not necessary for the Commissioner of Police to specify any particular property if he has reason to believe generally that the place to be searched is being made a storage for stolen property.
Search by police officer in arrestable case
34.
—(1)  A police officer investigating an arrestable offence may, without a search warrant, search or cause a search to be made for a document or other thing in any place —
(a)
if he considers that the document or thing to be necessary for his investigation and if he has reason to believe that a person who has been or may be issued with an order under section 20(1) will not or is unlikely to produce the document or thing or give access thereto as directed in the order;
(b)
he has reason to believe that the document or thing, which he considers to be necessary for his investigation, is likely to be removed; or
(c)
it is not known who possesses the document or thing which he considers to be necessary for his investigation.
(2)  The police officer in subsection (1) shall, if reasonably practicable, conduct the search in person.
(3)  The provisions of this Code relating to searches pursuant to search warrants shall, with the necessary modifications, apply to a search made under this section.
Powers to seize property in certain circumstances
35.
—(1)  A police officer may seize, or prohibit the disposal of or dealing in, any property —
(a)
in respect of which an offence is suspected to have been committed;
(b)
which is suspected to have been used or intended to be used to commit an offence; or
(c)
which is suspected to constitute evidence of an offence.
(2)  If the property liable to be seized under subsection (1) is held or suspected to be held in an account or a safe deposit box in a financial institution, a police officer of or above the rank of inspector may, by written order —
(a)
direct the financial institution to deliver the property to any police officer; or
(b)
direct the financial institution not to allow any dealings in respect of the property in such account or safe deposit box for such period as may be specified in the order.
(3)  A police officer to whom any property has been delivered under subsection (2)(a) must, as soon as is reasonably practicable, make a report of his receipt of the property at a police station.
(4)  A police officer may exercise the powers conferred under this section notwithstanding any provision in any other law relating to the seizure of, or the prohibition of any disposal of or dealing in, any property.
(5)  Where any property held in an account in a financial institution is subject to a written order made by a police officer under subsection (2)(b) —
(a)
any interest or other earnings on such account, or any other payments, may be credited into such account after the date on which the written order was made; and
(b)
any such interest, other earnings or payments shall be deemed to be subject to that same written order.
(6)  Any financial institution which contravenes an order made under subsection (2)(a) or (b) shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding $3,000.
(7)  A court may —
(a)
subsequent to an order of a police officer made under subsection (2); and
(b)
on the application of any person who is prevented from dealing with property,
order the release of such property or any part of such property.
(8)  The court shall only order a release of property under subsection (7) if it is satisfied that —
(a)
such release is necessary for the payment of basic expenses, including any payment for foodstuff, rent, the discharge of a mortgage, medicine, medical treatment, taxes, insurance premiums and public utility charges;
(b)
such release is necessary exclusively for —
(i)
the payment of reasonable professional fees and the reimbursement of any expenses incurred in connection with the provision of legal services; or
(ii)
the payment of fees or service charges imposed for the routine holding or maintenance of the property which the person is prevented from dealing in;
(c)
such release is necessary for the payment of any extraordinary expenses;
(d)
the property is the subject of any judicial, administrative or arbitral lien or judgment, in which case the property may be used to satisfy such lien or judgment, provided that the lien or judgment arose or was entered before the order was made under subsection (2)(b); or
(e)
such release is necessary, where the person is a company incorporated in Singapore, for any day-to-day operations of the company.
(9)  In this section, property in respect of which an offence is suspected to have been committed and property which is suspected to have been used or intended to be used to commit an offence include —
(a)
such property as was originally in the possession or under the control of any person;
(b)
any property into or for which the property which was originally in the possession or under the control of any person has been converted or exchanged and anything acquired by such conversion or exchange, whether immediately or otherwise; and
(c)
if the property referred to in paragraph (a) or (b) is money kept in an account in a financial institution, any interest or other earnings on such account or any other payment which is credited into such account after the date —
(i)
on which the offence is suspected to have been committed; or
(ii)
on which the property is suspected to have been used or intended to be used to commit an offence.
Forfeiture of counterfeit coin or counterfeit currency note or bank note, etc.
36.
—(1)  Any police officer of or above the rank of sergeant, upon being satisfied that any person has in his possession —
(a)
any counterfeit coin or current coin or any die, instrument or material for the purpose of counterfeiting any coin or current coin; or
(b)
any forged or counterfeit currency note or bank note or any machinery, instrument or material used for the forging or counterfeiting of any currency note or bank note,
may, without warrant and with or without assistance, enter and search any place where any such coin, currency note or bank note or any such die, machinery, instrument or material is kept and seize any such coin, note, die, machinery, instrument or material.
(2)  Anything seized under subsection (1) shall, by order of the court before which any person is tried relating to such possession, or where there is no trial, by order of a Magistrate, be forfeited and shall be destroyed or otherwise disposed of in such manner as the Minister may direct.
(3)  In this section, “coin”, “current coin”, “die” and “instrument” have the same meanings as in the Penal Code (Cap. 224).
Application of fees, etc., received by Board
37.
—(1)  All fees, penalties and other moneys payable under this Act shall be paid to the Board to be applied in the first place to defraying the expenses incurred by the Board in the administration of this Act, including the remuneration of the Registrar and other officers and employees of the Board, and thereafter to providing scholarships and the promotion of learning and education in connection with the profession of surveying.
(2)  The Registrar shall take and receive all moneys payable to the Board under this Act.
(3)  All fees and other moneys payable to the Board under this Act shall be paid forthwith into a bank account approved by the Minister.
(4)  The Board may from time to time invest any moneys not immediately required by the Board in such trustees’ securities as the Board may determine.
(5)  The Board shall keep full and proper accounts of all moneys received and expended by it and the accounts shall be audited by an auditor approved by the Minister.
Penalty for wilful falsification of register and for wrongfully procuring registration, etc
38.  Any person who —
(a)
wilfully makes or causes to be made any false entry in or falsification of any register kept and maintained under this Act;
(b)
wilfully procures or attempts to procure —
(i)
for any corporation or partnership any licence; or
(ii)
for himself or any other person a practising certificate or to be registered as a surveyor under this Act,
by making or producing or causing to be made or produced any false or fraudulent representation or declaration, either verbally or in writing, or by intentionally suppressing any material fact and furnishing information which is misleading; or
(c)
knowingly aids or assists in any of the acts mentioned in paragraph (a) or (b),
shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding $4,000.
Offences by bodies corporate, etc
39.  Where a corporation, partnership or unincorporated association of persons is guilty of an offence under this Act and that offence is proved to have been committed with the authority, consent or connivance of any director, manager, partner, secretary or other similar officer of the corporation, partnership or association or any person who was purporting to act in any such capacity, he, as well as the corporation, partnership or association, shall be guilty of that offence and shall be liable to be proceeded against and punished accordingly.
Power to access decryption information
40.
—(1)  For the purposes of investigating an arrestable offence, the Public Prosecutor may by order authorise a police officer or an authorised person to exercise, in addition to the powers under section 39, all or any of the powers under this section.
(2)  The police officer or authorised person referred to in subsection (1) shall be entitled to —
(a)
access any information, code or technology which has the capability of retransforming or unscrambling encrypted data into readable and comprehensible format or text for the purposes of investigating the arrestable offence;
(b)
require —
(i)
any person whom he reasonably suspects of using a computer in connection with an arrestable offence or of having used it in this way; or
(ii)
any person having charge of, or otherwise concerned with the operation of, such computer,
to provide him with such reasonable technical and other assistance as he may require for the purposes of paragraph (a); and
(c)
require any person whom he reasonably suspects to be in possession of any decryption information to grant him access to such decryption information as may be necessary to decrypt any data required for the purposes of investigating the arrestable offence.
(3)  Any person who obstructs the lawful exercise by a police officer or an authorised person of the powers under subsection (2)(a) or who fails to comply with any requirement of the police officer or authorised person under subsection (2)(b) or (c) shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding $10,000 or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 3 years or to both.
(4)  Where a person is convicted of an offence under subsection (3) and it is shown that the encrypted data contains evidence relevant to the planning, preparation or commission of a specified serious offence, he shall, in lieu of the punishment prescribed under subsection (3) —
(a)
be liable to be punished with the same punishment prescribed for that specified serious offence, except that the punishment imposed shall not exceed a fine of $50,000 or imprisonment for a term not exceeding 10 years or both; or
(b)
be liable to a fine not exceeding $50,000 or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 10 years or to both where the specified serious offence is punishable on conviction with death or imprisonment for life.
(5)  For the purposes of subsection (4) but subject to subsection (6), “specified serious offence” means an offence under any of the following written laws:
(a)
any written law which provides for any offence involving the causing of death or bodily harm;
(b)
any written law relating to actions or the threat of actions prejudicial to national security;
(c)
any written law relating to radiological or biological weapons;
(g)
the Hijacking of Aircraft and Protection of Aircraft and International Airports Act (Cap. 124);
(l)
the Statutory Bodies and Government Companies (Protection of Secrecy) Act (Cap. 319);
(o)
the United Nations (Anti-Terrorism Measures) Regulations (Cap. 339, Rg 1); and
(p)
such other written law as the Minister may, by order published in the Gazette, specify.
(6)  No offence shall be a specified serious offence for the purposes of subsection (4) unless the maximum punishment prescribed for that offence, whether for a first or subsequent conviction, is —
(a)
imprisonment for a term of 5 years or more;
(b)
imprisonment for life; or
(c)
death.
(7)  In proceedings against any person for an offence under this section, if it is shown that that person was in possession of any decryption information at any time before the time of the request for access to such information, that person shall be presumed for the purposes of those proceedings to have continued to be in possession of that decryption information at all subsequent times, unless it is shown that the decryption information —
(a)
was not in his possession at the time the request was made; and
(b)
continued not to be in his possession after the request was made.
(8)  A person who had acted in good faith or in compliance with a requirement under subsection (2) shall not be liable in any criminal or civil proceedings for any loss or damage resulting from the act.
(9)  In this section —
“data” means representations of information or of concepts that are being prepared or have been prepared in a form suitable for use in a computer;
“decryption information” means information, code or technology or part thereof that enables or facilitates the retransformation or unscrambling of encrypted data from its unreadable and incomprehensible format to its plain text version;
“encrypted data” means data which has been transformed or scrambled from its plain text version to an unreadable or incomprehensible format, regardless of the technique utilised for such transformation or scrambling and irrespective of the medium in which such data occurs or can be found for the purposes of protecting the content of such data;
“plain text version” means the original data before it has been transformed or scrambled to an unreadable or incomprehensible format.