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Contents  

Part I PRELIMINARY

Part II REGISTRATION AND MARKING OF AIRCRAFT

Part III AIRWORTHINESS AND EQUIPMENT OF AIRCRAFT

Part IV AIRCRAFT CREW AND LICENSING

Part V OPERATION OF AIRCRAFT

Part VI AIRCRAFT NOISE

Part VII FATIGUE OF CREW

Part VIIA EXHIBITIONS OF FLYING

Part VIII DOCUMENTS AND RECORDS

Part IX CONTROL OF AIR TRAFFIC

Part X AERODROMES, AERONAUTICAL LIGHTS AND DANGEROUS LIGHTS

Part XI GENERAL

FIRST SCHEDULE

SECOND SCHEDULE A, B and C Conditions

THIRD SCHEDULE Categories of Aircraft

FOURTH SCHEDULE Maintenance Engineers: Privileges of Licences

FIFTH SCHEDULE Aircraft Equipment

SIXTH SCHEDULE Radio Equipment to be Carried in Aircraft

SEVENTH SCHEDULE Aircraft, Engine and Propeller Log Books

EIGHTH SCHEDULE Flight Crew of Aircraft: Licences and Ratings

NINTH SCHEDULE Public Transport — Operational Requirements

TENTH  SCHEDULE Documents to be Carried by Aircraft Registered in Singapore

ELEVENTH  SCHEDULE Rules of the Air and Air Traffic Control

TWELFTH  SCHEDULE Fees

THIRTEENTH  SCHEDULE Penalties

FOURTEENTH  SCHEDULE Medical Requirements

FIFTEENTH  SCHEDULE

SIXTEENTH  SCHEDULE Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications — Specified Airspace and Navigation Performance Capability

Legislative History

 
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PART V
OPERATION OF AIRCRAFT
Operations manual
25.
—(1)  This paragraph shall apply to public transport aircraft registered in Singapore except aircraft used for the time being solely for flights not intended to exceed 60 minutes in duration, which are either —
(a)
flights solely for training persons to perform duties in an aircraft; or
(b)
flights intended to begin and end at the same aerodrome.
(2)  (a)  The operator of every aircraft to which this paragraph applies shall —
(i)
make available to each member of his operating staff an operations manual;
(ii)
ensure that each copy of the operations manual is kept up to date; and
(iii)
ensure that on each flight every member of the crew has access to a copy of every part of the operations manual which is relevant to his duties on the flight.
(b)
Each operations manual shall contain all such information and instructions as may be necessary to enable the operating staff to perform their duties as such including, in particular, information and instructions relating to the matters specified in Part A of the Ninth Schedule:
Provided that the operations manual shall not be required to contain any information or instructions available in a flight manual accessible to the persons by whom the information or instructions may be required.
(3)  An aircraft to which this paragraph applies shall not fly unless not less than 30 days prior to such flight the operator of the aircraft has furnished to the Minister a copy of the whole of the operations manual for the time being in effect in respect of the aircraft.
[S 278/2010 wef 15/05/2010]
[S 61/93 wef 19/03/1993]
(3A)  Subject to sub-paragraph (3B), any amendment or addition to the operations manual shall be furnished to the Minister by the operator before or immediately after it comes into effect.
[S 278/2010 wef 15/05/2010]
[S 61/93 wef 19/03/1993]
(3B)  Where an amendment or addition relates to the operation of an aircraft to which the operations manual did not previously relate, that aircraft shall not fly for the purpose of public transport until the amendment or addition has been furnished to the Minister .
[S 278/2010 wef 15/05/2010]
[S 61/93 wef 19/03/1993]
(3C)  Without prejudice to the foregoing sub-paragraphs the operators shall make such amendments or additions to the operations manual as the Minister may require for the purpose of ensuring the safety of the aircraft or of any persons or property carried therein or the safety, efficiency or regularity of air navigation.
[S 278/2010 wef 15/05/2010]
[S 61/93 wef 19/03/1993]
(4)  For the purposes of this paragraph and the Ninth Schedule, “operating staff” means the employees and agents employed by the operator, whether or not as members of the crew of the aircraft, to ensure that the flights of the aircraft are conducted in a safe manner, and includes an operator who performs those functions.
(5)  If in the course of a flight on which the equipment specified in Scale 0 in paragraph 5 of the Fifth Schedule is required to be provided in an aircraft and the said equipment becomes unserviceable, the aircraft shall be operated for the remainder of the flight in accordance with any relevant instructions in the operations manual.
[S 61/93 wef 19/03/1993]
Training manual
26.
—(1)  The operator of every aircraft registered in Singapore and flying for the purpose of public transport shall:
(a)
make a training manual available to every person appointed by the operator to give or to supervise the training, experience, practice or periodical test required under paragraph 27(2); and
(b)
ensure that each copy of that training manual is kept up to date.
(2)  Each training manual shall contain all such information and instructions as may be necessary to enable a person appointed by the operator to give or to supervise the training, experience, practice and periodical tests required under paragraph 27(2) to perform his duties as such including in particular information and instructions relating to the matters specified in Part C of the Ninth Schedule.
(3)  (a)  An aircraft to which this paragraph applies shall not fly unless not less than 30 days prior to such flight the operator of the aircraft has furnished to the chief executive officer a copy of the whole of his training manual relating to the crew of that aircraft.
[S 278/2010 wef 15/05/2010]
(b)
Subject to sub-paragraph (3)(c), any amendment or addition to the training manual shall be furnished to the chief executive officer by the operator before or immediately after they come into effect.
[S 278/2010 wef 15/05/2010]
(c)
Where an amendment or addition relates to training, experience, practice or periodical tests on an aircraft to which the training manual did not previously relate, that aircraft shall not fly for the purpose of public transport until the amendment or addition has been furnished to the chief executive officer.
[S 278/2010 wef 15/05/2010]
[S 61/93 wef 19/03/1993]
(d)
Without prejudice to sub-paragraphs (1) and (2) the operator shall make such amendments or additions to the training manual as the chief executive officer may require for the purpose of ensuring the safety of the aircraft or of persons or property carried therein or the safety, efficiency or regularity of air navigation.
[S 278/2010 wef 15/05/2010]
Public transport — operators’ responsibilities
27.
—(1)  The operator of a Singapore aircraft shall not permit the aircraft to fly for the purpose of public transport without first —
(a)
designating from among the flight crew a pilot to be the commander of the aircraft for the flight;
[S 423/2010 wef 02/08/2010]
(b)
satisfying himself by every reasonable means that the aeronautical radio stations and navigation aids serving the intended route or any planned diversion therefrom are adequate for the safe navigation of the aircraft; and
(c)
satisfying himself by every reasonable means that the aerodrome at which it is intended to take off or land and any alternate aerodrome at which a landing may be made are suitable for the purpose and in particular are adequately manned and equipped including such manning and equipment as may be notified to ensure the safety of the aircraft and its passengers:
Provided that the operator of the aircraft shall not be required to satisfy himself as to the adequacy of firefighting, search, rescue or other services which are required only after the occurrence of an accident.
(2)  The operator of a Singapore aircraft shall not permit any person to be a member of the crew thereof during any flight for the purpose of public transport (except a flight for the sole purpose of training persons to perform duties in aircraft) unless such person has had the training, experience, practice and periodical tests specified in Part B of the Ninth Schedule in respect of the duties which he is to perform and unless the operator has satisfied himself that such person is competent to perform his duties, and in particular to use the equipment provided in the aircraft for that purpose. The operator shall maintain, preserve, produce and furnish information respecting records relating to the foregoing matters in accordance with Part B of that Schedule.
(3)  The operator of a Singapore aircraft shall not permit any member of the flight crew thereof, during any flight for the purpose of the public transport of passengers to simulate emergency manoeuvres and procedures which will adversely affect the flight characteristics of the aircraft.
(4)  The operator of a Singapore aircraft shall adopt a security programme and shall ensure that such a programme is compatible with any aerodrome security programme.
Public transport — loading of aircraft
28.
—(1)  The operator of a Singapore aircraft shall not cause or permit it to be loaded or any load to be suspended therefrom for a flight for the purpose of public transport except under the supervision of a person whom he has caused to be furnished with written instructions as to the distribution and securing of the load so as to ensure that —
(a)
the load may safely be carried on the flight; and
(b)
any conditions subject to which the Certificate of Airworthiness in force in respect of the aircraft was issued or rendered valid, being conditions relating to the loading of the aircraft, are complied with.
(2)  The instructions shall indicate the weight of the aircraft prepared for service, that is to say the aggregate of the basic weight (shown in the weight schedule referred to in paragraph 16) and the weight of such additional items in or on the aircraft as the operator thinks fit to include; and the instructions shall indicate the additional items included in the weight of the aircraft prepared for service, and shall show the position of the centre of gravity of the aircraft at that weight:
Provided that this sub-paragraph shall not apply in relation to a flight if —
(a)
the aircraft’s maximum total weight authorised does not exceed 1,150 kg; or
(b)
the aircraft’s maximum total weight authorised does not exceed 2,730 kg and the flight is intended not to exceed 60 minutes in duration and is either —
(i)
a flight solely for training persons to perform duties in an aircraft; or
(ii)
a flight intended to begin and end at the same aerodrome.
(3)  The operator of an aircraft shall not cause or permit it to be loaded in contravention of the instructions referred to in sub-paragraph (1).
(4)  The person supervising the loading of the aircraft shall, before the commencement of any such flight, prepare and sign a load sheet in duplicate conforming to the requirements specified in sub-paragraph (6) and shall (unless he is himself the commander of the aircraft) submit the load sheet for examination by the commander of the aircraft who shall upon being satisfied that the aircraft is loaded in the manner required by sub-paragraph (1) sign his name thereon:
Provided that the foregoing requirements of this paragraph shall not apply if —
(a)
the load and the distributing and securing thereof upon the next intended flight are to be unchanged from the previous flight and the commander of the aircraft makes and signs an endorsement to that effect upon the load sheet for the previous flight, indicating the date of the endorsement, the place of departure upon the next intended flight and the next intended place of destination; or
[S 423/2010 wef 02/08/2010]
(b)
sub-paragraph (2) does not apply in relation to the flight.
(5)  One copy of the load sheet shall be carried in the aircraft when paragraph 56 so requires until the flights to which it relates have been completed and one copy of that load sheet and of the instructions referred to in this paragraph shall be preserved by the operator until the expiration of a period of 6 months thereafter and shall not be carried in the aircraft.
(6)  Every load sheet required by sub-paragraph (4) shall contain the following particulars:
(a)
the nationality mark of the aircraft to which the load sheet relates, and the registration mark assigned to that aircraft by the Minister;
[S 278/2010 wef 15/05/2010]
(b)
particulars of the flight to which the load sheet relates;
(c)
the total weight of the aircraft as loaded for that flight;
(d)
the weight of the several items from which the total weight of the aircraft, as so loaded, has been calculated including in particular the weight of the aircraft prepared for service and the respective total weights of the passengers, crew, baggage and cargo intended to be carried on the flight; and
(e)
the manner in which the load is distributed and the resulting position of the centre of gravity of the aircraft which may be given approximately if and to the extent that the relevant Certificate of Airworthiness so permits,
and shall include at the foot or end of the load sheet a certificate signed by the person referred to in sub-paragraph (1) as responsible for the loading of the aircraft, that the aircraft has been loaded in accordance with the written instructions furnished to him by the operator of the aircraft pursuant to that sub-paragraph.
(7)  For the purpose of calculating the total weight of the aircraft the respective total weights of the passengers and crew entered in the load sheet shall be computed from the actual weight of each person and for that purpose each person shall be separately weighed:
Provided that in the case of an aircraft with a total seating capacity of 12 or more persons and subject to sub-paragraph (8), the weights may be calculated according to the following table and the load sheet shall bear a notation to that effect:
TABLE
 
 
(a) Males
75 kg
(b) Females
65 kg
(c) Children aged two and above but not exceeding 12 years of age
40 kg
(d) Infants under two years of age
10 kg
(8)  The commander of the aircraft shall, if in his opinion it is necessary to do so in the interests of the safety of the aircraft, require any or all of the passengers and crew to be actually weighed for the purpose of the entry to be made in the load sheet.
[S 423/2010 wef 02/08/2010]
(9)  The operator of an aircraft registered in Singapore and flying for the purpose of the public transport of passengers shall not cause or permit baggage to be carried in the passenger compartment of the aircraft unless such baggage can be properly secured and, in the case of an aircraft capable of seating more than 30 passengers, such baggage (other than baggage carried in accordance with a permission issued pursuant to paragraph 34) shall not exceed the capacity of the spaces in the passenger compartment approved by the chief executive officer for the purpose of stowing baggage.
[S 278/2010 wef 15/05/2010]
[S 61/93 wef 19/03/1993]
Public transport — operating conditions
29.
—(1)  No Singapore aircraft shall be flown for the purpose of public transport, unless such requirements as are prescribed in respect of its weight and related performance have been complied with.
(2)  The assessment of the ability of an aircraft to comply with sub-paragraph (1) shall be based on the information as to its performance contained in the Certificate of Airworthiness relating to the aircraft. In the event of the information given therein being insufficient for that purpose such assessment shall be based on the best information available to the commander of the aircraft.
[S 423/2010 wef 02/08/2010]
(3)  The requirements specified in Part D of the Ninth Schedule in respect of the weather conditions required for take-off, approach to landing and landing shall be complied with in respect of every aircraft to which paragraph 25 applies.
(4)  An aircraft registered in Singapore when flying over water for the purpose of public transport shall fly, except as may be necessary for the purpose of take-off or landing, at such an altitude as would enable the aircraft —
(a)
if it has one engine only, in the event of the failure of that engine; and
(b)
if it has more than one engine, in the event of the failure of one of those engines and with the remaining engine or engines operating within the maximum continuous power conditions specified in the Certificate of Airworthiness relating to the aircraft,
to reach a place at which it can safely land at a height sufficient to enable it to do so.
(5)  Except under and in accordance with the terms of any written permission granted by the chief executive officer to the operator, a Singapore aeroplane having two power units and a maximum total weight authorised exceeding 5,700 kg and which is not limited by its certificate of airworthiness to the carriage of fewer than 20 passengers, shall not fly for the purpose of public transport unless it will, in the meteorological conditions expected for the flight, at any point along the route or any planned diversion therefrom, not be more than 60 minutes flying time at the normal one engine inoperative cruise speed in still air from the nearest aerodrome.
Aircraft not registered in Singapore — aerodrome operating minima
30.
—(1)  A public transport aircraft registered in a country other than Singapore shall not fly in or over Singapore unless the operator thereof shall have furnished to the Minister such particulars as he may from time to time require relating to the aerodrome operating minima specified by the operator in relation to aerodromes in Singapore for the purpose of limiting their use by the aircraft for take-off or landing, including any instruction given by the operator in relation to such weather conditions. The aircraft shall not fly in or over Singapore unless the operator shall have made such amendments of or additions to the aerodrome operating minima so specified and shall comply with any instruction given by the Minister for the purpose of ensuring the safety of the aircraft or the safety, efficiency or regularity of air navigation.
[S 423/2010 wef 02/08/2010]
(2)  A public transport aircraft registered in a country other than Singapore shall not begin or end a flight at an aerodrome in Singapore in aerodrome operating minima less favourable than those so specified in the Ninth Schedule in relation to that aerodrome, or in contravention of the instructions referred to in sub-paragraph (1).
(3)  Without prejudice to sub-paragraph (2), a public transport aircraft registered in a country other than Singapore shall not commence or continue an approach to landing at an aerodrome in Singapore if the runway visual range at that aerodrome is at that time less than the relevant minimum for landing established in accordance with sub-paragraph (1).
(4)  For the purposes of this paragraph, “runway visual range”, in relation to a runway or landing strip, means the range over which the pilot of an aircraft on the centreline of a runway can see runway surface markings or the lights delineating the runway or identifying its centreline or, in the case of an aerodrome in Singapore, the distance, if any, communicated to the commander of the aircraft by or on behalf of the person in charge of the aerodrome as being the runway visual range.
[S 423/2010 wef 02/08/2010]
Pre-flight action by commander of aircraft
31.  The commander of a Singapore aircraft shall satisfy himself before the aircraft takes off —
(a)
that the flight can safely be made, taking into account the latest information available as to the route and aerodromes to be used, the weather reports and forecasts available, and any alternative course of action which can be adopted in case the flight cannot be completed as planned;
(b)
(i)
that the equipment (including radio equipment) required by or under this Order to be carried in the circumstances of the intended flight is carried and is in a fit condition for use; or
(ii)
that the flight may commence under and in accordance with the terms of a permission granted to the operator pursuant to paragraph 14;
(c)
that the aircraft is in every way fit for the intended flight, and that where certificates of maintenance review are required by paragraph 9(1) to be in force, they are in force and will not cease to be in force during the intended flight;
(d)
that the load carried by the aircraft is of such weight, and is so distributed and secured, and it may safely be carried on the intended flight;
(e)
in the case of a flying machine or airship, that sufficient fuel, oil and engine coolant (if required) are carried for the intended flight, and that a safe margin has been allowed for contingencies, and in the case of a flight for the purpose of public transport, that the instructions in the operations manual relating to fuel, oil and engine coolant have been complied with;
(f)
in the case of an airship or balloon, that sufficient ballast is carried for the intended flight;
(g)
in the case of a flying machine, that having regard to the performance of the flying machine in the conditions to be expected on the intended flight, and to any obstructions at the places of departure and intended destination and on the intended route, it is capable of safely taking off, reaching and maintaining a safe height thereafter, and making a safe landing at the place of intended destination; and
(h)
that any pre-flight check system established by the operator and set forth in the operations manual or elsewhere has been complied with by each member of the crew of the aircraft.
Passenger briefing by commander
32.  The commander of a Singapore aircraft shall take all reasonable steps to ensure —
(a)
before the aircraft takes off on any flight, that all passengers are made familiar with the position and method of use of emergency exits, safety belts (with diagonal shoulder strap, where required to be carried), safety harnesses and (where required to be carried) oxygen equipment, life-jackets, the floor path lighting system and all other devices required by or under this Order and intended for use by passengers individually in the case of an emergency occurring to the aircraft; and
[S 61/93 wef 19/03/1993]
(b)
in an emergency, that all passengers are instructed in the emergency action which they should take.
Pilots to remain at controls
33.
—(1)  The commander of a Singapore aircraft, being a flying machine or glider, shall cause one pilot to remain at the controls at all times while the aircraft is in flight. If the aircraft is required by or under this Order to carry two pilots, the commander shall cause both pilots to remain at the controls during take-off and landing. If the aircraft carries two or more pilots (whether or not it is required to do so) and is engaged on a flight for the purpose of the public transport of passengers the commander shall remain at the controls during take-off and landing.
[S 423/2010 wef 02/08/2010]
(2)  Each pilot at the controls shall be secured in his seat by either a safety belt with or without one diagonal shoulder strap, or a safety harness except that during take-off and landing a safety harness shall be worn if it is required by paragraph 12 to be evaded.
Public transport of passengers — additional duties of commander
34.
—(1)  This paragraph shall apply to flights for the purpose of the public transport of passengers by Singapore aircraft.
(2)  In relation to every flight to which this paragraph applies, the commander of the aircraft shall —
(a)
(i)
if the aircraft is not a seaplane but is intended in the course of the flight to reach a point more than 30 minutes flying time (while flying in still air at the speed specified in the relevant certificate of airworthiness as the speed for compliance with regulations governing flights over water) from the nearest land, take all reasonable steps to ensure that before take-off all passengers are given a demonstration of the method of use of the life-jackets required by or under this Order for the use of passengers;
(ii)
if the aircraft is not a seaplane but is required by paragraph 18(8) to carry cabin attendants, take all reasonable steps to ensure that, before the aircraft takes off on a flight —
(A)
which is intended to proceed beyond gliding distance from land; or
(B)
on which in the event of any emergency occurring during the take-off or during the landing at the intended destination or any likely alternate destination it is reasonably possible that the aircraft would be forced to land onto water,
all passengers are given a demonstration of the method of use of the life-jackets required by or under this Order for the use of passengers except that where the only requirement to give such a demonstration arises because it is reasonably possible that the aircraft would be forced to land onto water at one or more of the likely alternate destinations the demonstration need not be given until after the decision has been taken to divert to such a destination;
(b)
if the aircraft is a seaplane, take all reasonable steps to ensure that before the aircraft takes off all passengers are given a demonstration of the method of use of the equipment referred to in sub-paragraph (2)(a);
(c)
before the aircraft takes off, and before it lands, take all reasonable steps to ensure that the crew of the aircraft are properly secured in their seats and that all persons carried in compliance with paragraph 18(8) are properly secured in seats which shall be in a passenger compartment and which shall be so situated that those persons can readily assist passengers;
(d)
before the aircraft takes off, and before it lands, and whenever by reason of turbulent air or any emergency occurring during flight he considers the precaution necessary —
(i)
take all reasonable steps to ensure that all passengers of two years of age or more are properly secured in their seats by safety belts (with diagonal shoulder strap, where required to be carried) or safety harnesses and that all passengers under the age of two years are properly secured by means of a child restraint device; and
(ii)
take all reasonable steps to ensure that those items of baggage in the passenger compartment which he reasonably considers ought by virtue of their size, weight and nature to be properly secured are properly secured and, in the case of an aircraft capable of seating more than 30 passengers, that such baggage is either stowed in the passenger compartment stowage spaces approved by the chief executive officer for the purpose or carried in accordance with the terms of a written permission granted by the chief executive officer which permission may be granted subject to such conditions as the chief executive officer thinks fit.
[S 278/2010 wef 15/05/2010]
[S 61/93 wef 19/03/1993]
(e)
except in a case where a pressure greater than 700 millibars is maintained in all passenger and crew compartments throughout the flight, take all reasonable steps to ensure that —
(i)
before the aircraft reaches flight level 100 the method of use of the oxygen provided in the aircraft in compliance with the requirements of paragraph 12 is demonstrated to all passengers;
(ii)
when flying above flight level 120 all passengers and cabin attendants are recommended to use oxygen;
[S 384/2000 wef 31/08/2000]
(iii)
during any period when the aircraft is flying above flight level 100 oxygen is used by all the flight crew of the aircraft.
Operation of radio in aircraft
35.
—(1)  The radio station in an aircraft shall not be operated, whether or not the aircraft is in flight, except in accordance with the conditions of the licence issued in respect of that station under the law of the country in which the aircraft is registered , and by a person duly licensed or otherwise permitted to operate the radio station under the law.
[S 384/2000 wef 31/08/2000]
(2)  Whenever an aircraft is in flight in such circumstances that it is required by this Order to be equipped with radio communication equipment, a continuous radio watch shall be maintained by a member of the flight crew listening to the signals transmitted upon the frequency notified, or designated by a message received from an appropriate or aeronautical radio station, for use by that aircraft:
Provided that —
(a)
the radio watch may be discontinued or continued on another frequency to the extent that a message as aforesaid so permits or for reasons of safety; and
(b)
the watch may be kept by a device installed in the aircraft if —
(i)
the appropriate aeronautical radio station has been informed to that effect and has raised no objection; and
(ii)
that the station is notified or in the case of a station situated in a country other than Singapore, otherwise designated as transmitting a signal suitable for that purpose.
(3)  The radio station in an aircraft shall not be operated so as to cause interference which would impair the efficiency of aeronautical telecommunications or navigational services, and in particular emissions shall not be made except as follows:
(a)
emissions of the class and frequency for the time being in use, in accordance with general international aeronautical practice, in the airspace in which the aircraft is flying;
(b)
distress, urgency and safety messages and signals, in accordance with general international aeronautical practice;
(c)
messages and signals relating to the flight of the aircraft, in accordance with general international aeronautical practice;
(d)
such public correspondence messages as may be permitted by or under the aircraft radio station licence referred to in sub-paragraph (1).
(4)  In every Singapore aircraft which is equipped with radio communication equipment a telecommunication log book shall be kept in which the following entries shall be made:
(a)
the identification of the aircraft radio station;
(b)
the date and time of the beginning and end of every radio watch maintained in the aircraft and of the frequency on which it was maintained;
(c)
the date and time, and particulars of all messages and signals sent or received, including in particular details of any distress traffic sent or received;
(d)
particulars of any action taken upon the receipt of a distress signal or message; and
(e)
particulars of any failure or interruption of radio communications and the cause thereof:
Provided that a telecommunication log book shall not be required to be kept in respect of communication by radiotelephony with a radio station on land or on a ship which provides a radio service for aircraft.
(5)  The flight radio operator maintaining radio watch shall sign the entries in the telecommunication log book indicating the times at which he began and ended the maintenance of such watch.
(6)  The telecommunication log book shall be preserved by the operator of the aircraft until a date 6 months after the date of the last entry therein.
(7)  In any Singapore aircraft which is engaged on a flight for the purpose of public transport, the pilot and the flight engineer (if any) shall not make use of a hand-held microphone (whether for the purpose of radio communication or of intercommunication within the aircraft) whilst the aircraft is flying in controlled airspace at an altitude less than 15,000 feet above mean sea level or is taking-off or landing.
[S 581/2003 wef 12/12/2003]
[S 299/2009 wef 30/06/2009]
Minimum navigation performance
36.
—(1)  An aircraft registered in Singapore shall not fly in airspace specified in the Sixteenth Schedule unless —
(a)
it is equipped with navigation systems which enable the aircraft to maintain the navigation performance capability specified in the Sixteenth Schedule; and
(b)
the navigation systems required by sub-paragraph (1)(a) are approved by the chief executive officer and installed and maintained in a manner approved by the chief executive officer; and
[S 278/2010 wef 15/05/2010]
(c)
the operating procedures for the navigation systems required by sub-paragraph (1)(a) are approved by the chief executive officer; and
[S 278/2010 wef 15/05/2010]
(d)
the equipment is operated in accordance with the approved procedures while the aircraft is flying in the airspace.
Use of flight recording systems and preservation of records
37.
—(1)  The operator of the aeroplane shall at all times subject to paragraph 59, preserve —
(a)
the last 25 hours of recording made by any flight data recorder required by paragraph 4(5) of the Fifth Schedule to be carried in an aeroplane; or
(b)
the last half an hour of recording made by any flight data recorder required by paragraph 4(6) of the Fifth Schedule to be carried in an aeroplane; or
(c)
the last 10 hours of recording made by any flight data recorder required by paragraph 4(7) of the Fifth Schedule to be carried in a helicopter; and
(d)
a record of not less than one representative flight, that is to say, a recording of a flight made within the last 12 months which includes a take-off, climb, cruise, descent, approach to landing and landing, together with a means of identifying the record with the flight to which it relates.
(2)  The operator of the aeroplane shall preserve the records mentioned in sub-paragraph (1) for such period as the chief executive officer may in a particular case direct.
[S 278/2010 wef 15/05/2010]
(3)  On any flight on which a flight data recorder or a cockpit voice recorder is required by this Order to be carried —
(a)
in an aeroplane, it shall always be in use from the beginning of the take-off run to the end of the landing run; and
(b)
in a helicopter, it shall always be in use from the time the rotors first turn for the purpose of taking off until the rotors are next stopped.
Towing of gliders
38.
—(1)  An aircraft in flight shall not tow a glider unless the Certificate of Airworthiness issued or rendered valid in respect of the towing aircraft under the law of the country in which that aircraft is registered includes an express provision that it may be used for that purpose.
(2)  The length of the combination of towing aircraft, tow rope and glider in flight shall not exceed 150 metres.
(3)  The commander of an aircraft which is about to tow a glider shall satisfy himself, before the towing aircraft takes off —
(a)
that the tow rope is in good condition and is of adequate strength for the purpose, and that the combination of towing aircraft and glider, having regard to its performance in the conditions to be expected on the intended flight and to any obstructions at the place of departure and on the intended route, is capable of safely taking off, reaching and maintaining a safe height at which to separate the combination and that thereafter the towing aircraft can make a safe landing at the place of intended destination;
(b)
that signals have been agreed and communications established with persons suitably stationed so as to enable glider to take-off safely; and
(c)
that emergency signals have been agreed between the commander of the towing aircraft and the commander of the glider, to be used, respectively, by the commander of the towing aircraft to indicate that the tow should immediately be released by the glider, and by the commander of the glider to indicate that the tow cannot be released.
[S 423/2010 wef 02/08/2010]
(4)  The glider shall be attached to the towing aircraft by means of the tow rope before the aircraft takes off.
Towing, picking up and raising of persons and articles
39.
—(1)  Subject to this paragraph, an aircraft in flight shall not, by means external to the aircraft, tow any article other than a glider, or pick up or raise any person, animal or article unless the Certificate of Airworthiness issued or rendered valid in respect of that aircraft under the laws of the country in which the aircraft is registered includes an express provision that it may be used for that purpose.
(2)  An aircraft in flight shall not tow any article other than a glider, at night or when flight visibility is less than 1.6 kilometres.
(3)  The length of the combination of towing aircraft, tow rope and article in tow, shall not exceed 150 metres.
(4)  A helicopter shall not fly at any height over a congested area of a city, town or settlement at any time when an article, person or animal is suspended from the helicopter.
(5)  A passenger shall not be carried in a helicopter at any time when an article, person or animal is suspended therefrom, other than a passenger who has duties to perform in connection with the article, person or animal.
(6)  Nothing in this paragraph shall —
(a)
prohibit the towing in a reasonable manner by an aircraft in flight of any radio aerial, any instrument which is being used for experimental purposes, or any signal, apparatus or article required or permitted by or under this Order to be towed or displayed by an aircraft in flight;
(b)
prohibit the picking up or raising of any person, animal or article in an emergency or for the purpose of saving life;
(c)
apply to any aircraft while it is flying in accordance with the “B Conditions” set out in the Second Schedule; or
(d)
be taken to permit the towing or picking up of a glider otherwise than in accordance with paragraph 38.
Dropping of persons and articles
40.
—(1)  Articles and animals (whether or not attached to a parachute) shall not be dropped, or permitted to drop, from an aircraft in flight so as to endanger persons or property.
(2)  Articles, animals and persons (whether or not attached to a parachute) shall not be dropped, or permitted to drop, to the surface from an aircraft flying in Singapore:
Provided that this sub-paragraph shall not apply to the descent of persons by parachute from an aircraft in an emergency, or to the dropping of articles by or with the authority of the commander of the aircraft in the following circumstances:
(a)
the dropping of articles for the purpose of saving life;
(b)
jettisoning, in case of emergency, of fuel or other articles in the aircraft;
(c)
the dropping of ballast in the form of fine sand or water;
(d)
the dropping of articles solely for the purpose of navigating the aircraft in accordance with ordinary practice or with this Order;
(e)
the dropping at an aerodrome in accordance with this Order, of ropes, banners or similar articles towed by aircraft; and
(f)
the dropping of articles for the purposes of agriculture, horticulture or public health or as a measure against weather conditions or oil pollution, or for training for the dropping of articles for any such purposes, if the articles are dropped with the permission of the chief executive officer and in accordance with any conditions subject to which that permission may have been given.
(3)  For the purposes of this paragraph, dropping includes projecting and lowering.
(4)  Nothing in this paragraph shall prohibit the lowering of any person, animal or article from a helicopter to the surface, if the Certificate of Airworthiness issued or rendered valid in respect of the helicopter under the law of the country in which it is registered includes an express provision that it may be used for that purpose.
Carriage of munitions of war
41.
—(1)  An aircraft shall not carry any munitions of war.
(2)  It shall be unlawful for any person to take or cause to be taken on board an aircraft, or to deliver or cause to be delivered for carriage thereon, any goods which he knows or has reason to believe or suspects to be munitions of war.
(3)  For the purposes of this paragraph, “munition of war” means such weapons and ammunition designed for use in warfare or against the person, including parts designed for such weapons and ammunition.
Carriage of dangerous goods
42.
—(1)  Dangerous goods shall not be carried in an aircraft except as follows:
(a)
goods carried in accordance with any regulations which the Minister may make to permit dangerous goods to be carried either in aircraft generally or in aircraft of any class specified in the regulations;
(b)
goods carried with the written permission of the Minister, and in accordance with any conditions to which such permission may be subject;
(c)
goods carried in an aircraft with the consent of the operator thereof for the purpose of ensuring the proper navigation or safety of the aircraft or the well-being of any person on board; and
(d)
goods permitted to be carried under the laws of the country in which the aircraft is registered, if there is in force in relation to such country an agreement between the Government and the government of the country permitting the carriage of dangerous goods within Singapore in aircraft registered in that country.
(2)  Dangerous goods permitted by this Order to be carried in an aircraft shall not be loaded as cargo therein unless —
(a)
the consignor of the goods has furnished the operator of the aircraft with particulars in writing of the nature of the goods and the danger to which they give rise; and
(b)
the goods have been properly packed and the container in which they are packed is properly and clearly marked and labelled so as to indicate that danger to the person loading the goods in the aircraft.
(3)  The operator of any aircraft shall —
(a)
ensure that passengers are warned as to the type of goods that they are prohibited from transporting on board an aircraft as checked baggage or carry-on articles;
(b)
ensure that flight crew and other employees including his agents are provided with such information and training as will enable them to carry out their responsibilities with regard to the transport of dangerous goods;
(c)
before the commencement of any training course relating to the transport of dangerous goods, submit to the chief executive officer for approval the programmes and syllabi of the training course; and
[S 278/2010 wef 15/05/2010]
(d)
as soon as practicable and before any flight begins, inform the commander of the aircraft in writing of the identity of any dangerous goods on board the aircraft, the danger to which they give rise and the weight or quantity of the goods.
(4)  It shall be unlawful for any person to take or cause to be taken on board any aircraft, or to deliver or cause to be delivered for loading thereon, any goods which he knows or ought to know or suspect to be dangerous goods the carriage of which is prohibited by this paragraph.
(5)  The operator of any aircraft shall as soon as practicable notify the chief executive officer of any dangerous goods accident or incident.
[S 278/2010 wef 15/05/2010]
(6)  Where any dangerous goods accident or incident occurs, the chief executive officer shall cause an investigation to be made in such manner as he thinks necessary.
[S 278/2010 wef 15/05/2010]
(7)  For the purposes of any investigation under sub-paragraph (6), any person authorised by the chief executive officer to carry out the investigation may —
(a)
require such persons as he thinks necessary to answer any question or furnish any information or produce any document, paper and article and retain any such document, paper and article until the completion of the investigation;
(b)
have access to and examine any consignment of goods; and
(c)
enter and inspect any place the entry or inspection whereof appears to him to be necessary.
(8)  For the purpose of this paragraph —
“dangerous goods” means articles or substances which are capable of posing significant risk to health, safety or property when transported by air;
“dangerous goods accident” means an occurrence associated with and related to the transport of dangerous goods by air which results in fatal or serious injury to a person or major property damage;
“dangerous goods incident” means an occurrence, other than a dangerous goods accident, associated with and related to the transport of dangerous goods by air, not necessarily occurring on board an aircraft, which results in injury to a person, property damage, fire, breakage, spillage, leakage of fluid or radiation or other evidence that the integrity of the packaging has not been maintained; and includes any occurrence; relating to the transport of dangerous goods, which seriously jeopardizes the aircraft or its occupants.
(9)  This paragraph shall be additional to and not in derogation from paragraph 41.
Method of carriage of persons
43.  A person shall not be in or on part of an aircraft in flight which is not a part designed for the accommodation of persons and in particular a person shall not be on the wings or undercarriage of an aircraft. A person shall not be in or on any object, other than a glider or flying machine, towed by or attached to an aircraft in flight:
Provided that a person may have temporary access to —
(a)
any part of an aircraft for the purpose of taking action necessary for the safety of the aircraft or of any person or cargo therein; or
(b)
any part of an aircraft in which cargo or stores are carried, being a part which is designed to enable a person to have access thereto while the aircraft is in flight.
Exits and break-in markings
44.
—(1)  This paragraph shall apply to public transport aircraft registered in Singapore.
(2)  Whenever an aircraft to which this paragraph applies is carrying passengers, every exit therefrom and every internal door in the aircraft shall be in working order, and during take-off and landing and during any emergency every such exit and door shall be kept free of obstruction and shall not be fastened by locking or otherwise so as to prevent, hinder or delay its use by passengers:
Provided that —
(a)
an exit may be obstructed by cargo if it is an exit which, in accordance with arrangements approved by the chief executive officer either generally or in relation to a class of aircraft or a particular aircraft, is not required for use by passengers;
[S 278/2010 wef 15/05/2010]
(b)
a door between the flight crew compartment and any adjacent compartment to which passengers have access may be locked or bolted if the commander of the aircraft so determines, for the purpose of preventing access by passengers to the flight crew compartment; and
[S 423/2010 wef 02/08/2010]
(c)
nothing in this paragraph shall apply to any internal door which is so placed that it cannot prevent, hinder or delay the exit of passengers from the aircraft in an emergency if it is not in working order.
(3)  Every exit from the aircraft shall be marked with the words “EXIT” or “EMERGENCY EXIT”.
(4)  (a)  Every exit from the aircraft shall be marked with instructions in English and with diagrams, to indicate the correct method of opening the exit.
(b)
The markings shall be placed on or near the inside surface of the door or other closure of the exit and, if it is openable from the outside of the aircraft, on or near the exterior surface.
(5)  (a)  Every aircraft to which this paragraph applies, being an aircraft of which the maximum total weight authorised exceeds 3,600 kg shall be marked upon the exterior surface of its fuselage with marking to show the areas (referred to in this sub-paragraph as break-in areas) which can, for purposes of rescue in an emergency, be most readily and effectively broken into by persons outside the aircraft.
(b)
The break-in areas shall be rectangular in shape and shall be marked by right-angled corner markings, each arm of which shall be 10 cm in length along its outer edge and 2.5 cm in width.
[S 166/2002 wef 15/04/2002]
(c)
The words “CUT HERE IN EMERGENCY” shall be marked across the centre of each break-in area.
(6)  On every flight by an aircraft to which this paragraph applies, being an aircraft of which the maximum total weight authorised exceeds 5,700 kg, every exit from such an aircraft intended to be used by passengers in an emergency shall be marked upon the exterior of the aircraft by a band not less than 5 cm in width outlining the exit.
(7)  The markings required by this paragraph shall —
(a)
be painted, or affixed by other equally permanent means;
(b)
except in the case of the markings required by sub-paragraph (6), be red in colour and, in any case in which the colour of the adjacent background is such as to render red markings not readily visible, be outlined in white or some other contrasting colour in such a manner as to render them readily visible;
(c)
in the case of the markings required by sub-paragraph (6), be of a colour clearly contrasting with the background on which it appears;
(d)
be kept at all times clean and unobscured.
(8)  If one, but not more than one, exit from an aircraft becomes inoperative at a place where it is not reasonably practicable for it to be repaired or replaced, nothing in this paragraph shall prevent that aircraft from carrying passengers until it next lands at a place where the exit can be repaired or replaced:
Provided that —
(a)
the number of passengers carried and the position of the seats which they occupy is in accordance with arrangements approved by the chief executive officer either in relation to the particular aircraft or to a class of aircraft; and
[S 278/2010 wef 15/05/2010]
(b)
in accordance with arrangements so approved, the exit is fastened by locking or otherwise, the words “Exit” or “Emergency Exit” are covered and the exit is marked by a red disc at least 23 centimetres in diameter with a horizontal white bar across it bearing the words “No exit” in red letters.
Imperilling safety of aircraft
45.  A person shall not wilfully or negligently imperil the safety of an aircraft or any person on board, whether by interference with any member of the flight crew of the aircraft, or by tampering with the aircraft or its equipment or by disorderly conduct or by any other means.
Imperilling safety of any person or property
46.  A person shall not wilfully or negligently cause or permit an aircraft to endanger any person or property.
Intoxication in aircraft
47.
—(1)  A person shall not enter any aircraft when drunk, or be drunk in any aircraft.
(2)  A person under the influence of a drug to such an extent as to impair his senses shall not enter or be in any aircraft.
(3)  A person shall not, when acting as a member of the crew of any aircraft or being carried in any aircraft for the purpose of so acting, be under the influence of drink or a drug.
Smoking in aircraft
48.
—(1)  Notices indicating when smoking is prohibited shall be exhibited in every Singapore aircraft so as to be visible from each passenger seat therein.
(2)  A person shall not smoke in any compartment of a Singapore aircraft at a time when smoking is prohibited in that compartment by a notice to that effect exhibited by or on behalf of the commander of the aircraft.
[S 423/2010 wef 02/08/2010]
Authority of commander of aircraft
49.  Every person in a Singapore aircraft shall obey all lawful commands which the commander of that aircraft may give for the purpose of securing the safety of the aircraft and of persons or property carried therein, or the safety, efficiency or regularity of air navigation.
Stowaways
50.  A person shall not secrete himself for the purpose of being carried in an aircraft without the consent of either the operator or the commander thereof or of any other person entitled to give consent to his being carried in the aircraft.
[S 423/2010 wef 02/08/2010]