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Contents

Long Title

Chapter I — PRELIMINARY

Chapter II — GENERAL EXPLANATIONS

Chapter III — PUNISHMENTS

Chapter IV — GENERAL EXCEPTIONS

Right of private defence

Chapter V — ABETMENT

Chapter VA — CRIMINAL CONSPIRACY

Chapter VI — OFFENCES AGAINST THE STATE

Chapter VIA — PIRACY

Chapter VIB — GENOCIDE

Chapter VII — OFFENCES RELATING TO THE ARMED FORCES

Chapter VIII — OFFENCES RELATING TO UNLAWFUL ASSEMBLY

Chapter IX — OFFENCES BY OR RELATING TO PUBLIC SERVANTS

Chapter X — CONTEMPTS OF THE LAWFUL AUTHORITY OF PUBLIC SERVANTS

Chapter XI — FALSE EVIDENCE AND OFFENCES AGAINST PUBLIC JUSTICE

Chapter XII — OFFENCES RELATING TO COIN AND GOVERNMENT STAMPS

Chapter XIII — OFFENCES RELATING TO WEIGHTS AND MEASURES

Chapter XIV — OFFENCES AFFECTING THE PUBLIC TRANQUILITY, PUBLIC HEALTH, SAFETY, CONVENIENCE, DECENCY AND MORALS

Chapter XV — OFFENCES RELATING TO RELIGION OR RACE

Chapter XVI — OFFENCES AFFECTING THE HUMAN BODY

Offences affecting life

Causing miscarriage; injuries to unborn children; exposure of infants; and concealment of births

Hurt

Wrongful restraint and wrongful confinement

Criminal force and assault

Kidnapping, abduction, slavery and forced labour

Sexual offences

Chapter XVII — OFFENCES AGAINST PROPERTY

Theft

Extortion

Robbery and gang-robbery

Criminal misappropriation of property

Criminal breach of trust

Receiving stolen property

Cheating

Fraudulent deeds and dispositions of property

Mischief

Criminal trespass

Chapter XVIII — OFFENCES RELATING TO DOCUMENTS OR ELECTRONIC RECORDS, FALSE INSTRUMENTS, AND TO CURRENCY NOTES AND BANK NOTES

Currency notes and bank notes

Chapter XX — OFFENCES RELATING TO MARRIAGE

Chapter XXI — DEFAMATION

Chapter XXII — CRIMINAL INTIMIDATION, INSULT AND ANNOYANCE

Chapter XXIII — ATTEMPTS TO COMMIT OFFENCES

Legislative Source Key

Legislative History

 
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On 20/12/2014, you requested the version in force on 20/12/2014 incorporating all amendments published on or before 20/12/2014. The closest version currently available is that of 01/07/2014.
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Chapter XII
OFFENCES RELATING TO COIN
AND GOVERNMENT STAMPS
“Coin” and “current coin”
230.  “Coin” is metal used as money stamped and issued by the authority of the Government or by the authority of the government of any foreign country in order to be so used.
“Current coin” means coin which is legal tender in Singapore or in any foreign country.
[51/2007]
Illustration
(a) to (c) [Deleted by Act 51 of 2007]
[Indian PC 1860, s. 230]
Counterfeiting coin
231.  Whoever counterfeits or knowingly performs any part of the process of counterfeiting coin, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 7 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
Explanation—A person commits this offence, who, intending to practise deception, or knowing it to be likely that deception will thereby be practised, causes a genuine coin to appear like a different coin.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 231]
Counterfeiting current coin
232.  Whoever counterfeits or knowingly performs any part of the process of counterfeiting current coin, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 10 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
[51/2007]
[Indian PC 1860, s. 232]
Making or selling instrument for counterfeiting coin
233.  Whoever makes or mends, or performs any part of the process of making or mending, or buys, sells or disposes of, any die or instrument, for the purpose of being used, or knowing or having reason to believe that it is intended to be used, for the purpose of counterfeiting coin, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 3 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 233]
Making or selling instrument for counterfeiting current coin
234.  Whoever makes or mends, or performs any part of the process of making or mending, or buys, sells or disposes of, any die or instrument for the purpose of being used, or knowing or having reason to believe that it is intended to be used, for the purpose of counterfeiting current coin, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 7 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 234]
Possession of instrument or material for the purpose of using the same for counterfeiting coin
235.  Whoever is in possession of any instrument or material for the purpose of using the same for counterfeiting coin, or knowing or having reason to believe that the same is intended to be used for that purpose, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 3 years, and shall also be liable to fine; and if the coin to be counterfeited is current coin, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 7 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
[51/2007]
[Indian PC 1860, s. 235]
Abetting in Singapore the counterfeiting out of Singapore of coin or current coin
236.  Whoever, being within Singapore, abets the counterfeiting of coin or current coin out of Singapore, shall be punished in the same manner as if he abetted the counterfeiting of such coin or current coin within Singapore.
[51/2007]
[Indian PC 1860, s. 236]
Import or export of counterfeit coin
237.  Whoever imports into Singapore, or exports therefrom, any counterfeit coin, knowing or having reason to believe that the same is counterfeit, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 3 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 237]
Import or export of counterfeits of current coin
238.  Whoever imports into Singapore, or exports therefrom, any counterfeit coin which he knows or has reason to believe to be a counterfeit of current coin, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 10 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
[51/2007]
[Indian PC 1860, s. 238]
Delivery to another of coin, possessed with the knowledge that it is counterfeit
239.  Whoever, having any counterfeit coin which at the time when he became possessed of it he knew to be counterfeit, fraudulently or with intent that fraud may be committed, delivers the same to any person, or attempts to induce any person to receive it, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 5 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 239]
Delivery of current coin, possessed with the knowledge that it is counterfeit
240.  Whoever, having any counterfeit coin which is a counterfeit of current coin, and which at the time when he became possessed of it he knew to be a counterfeit of current coin, fraudulently or with intent that fraud may be committed, delivers the same to any person, or attempts to induce any person to receive it, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 7 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
[51/2007]
[Indian PC 1860, s. 240]
Delivery to another of coin as genuine, which when first possessed the deliverer did not know to be counterfeit
241.  Whoever delivers to any other person as genuine, or attempts to induce any other person to receive as genuine, any counterfeit coin which he knows to be counterfeit, but which he did not know to be counterfeit at the time when he took it into his possession, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 2 years, or with fine to an amount which may extend to 10 times the value of the coin counterfeited, or with both.
Illustration
A, a coiner, delivers counterfeit Hong Kong dollars to his accomplice B, for the purpose of uttering them. B sells the dollars to C, another utterer, who buys them knowing them to be counterfeit. C pays away the dollars for goods to D, who receives them, not knowing them to be counterfeit. D, after receiving the dollars, discovers that they are counterfeit, and pays them away as if they were good. Here D is punishable only under this section, but B and C are punishable under section 239 or 240 as the case may be.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 241]
Delivery to another of current coin as genuine, which when first possessed the deliverer did not know to be counterfeit
241A.  Whoever delivers to any other person as genuine, or attempts to induce any other person to receive as genuine, any counterfeit coin which is a counterfeit of current coin which he knows to be counterfeit, but which he did not know to be counterfeit at the time when he took it into his possession, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 5 years, or with fine, or with both.
[51/2007]
Possession of counterfeit coin by a person who knew it to be counterfeit when he became possessed thereof
242.  Whoever, fraudulently or with intent that fraud may be committed, is in possession of counterfeit coin, having known at the time when he became possessed of it that the coin was counterfeit, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 3 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 242]
Possession of current coin by a person who knew it to be counterfeit when he became possessed thereof
243.  Whoever, fraudulently or with intent that fraud may be committed, is in possession of counterfeit coin, which is a counterfeit of current coin, having known at the time when he became possessed of it that it was a counterfeit, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 5 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
[51/2007]
[Indian PC 1860, s. 243]
Forfeiture of counterfeit coin
243A.  [Repealed by Act 51 of 2007]
Fraudulently or dishonestly diminishing the weight or altering the composition of any coin
*246.  Whoever fraudulently or dishonestly performs on any coin any operation which diminishes the weight or alters the composition of that coin shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 3 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
Explanation—A person who scoops out part of the coin and puts anything else into the cavity, alters the composition of that coin.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 246]
*  There are no sections 244 and 245.
Fraudulently or dishonestly diminishing the weight or altering the composition of current coin
247.  Whoever fraudulently or dishonestly performs on any current coin any operation which diminishes the weight or alters the composition of that coin, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 7 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 247]
Altering appearance of any coin with intent that it shall pass as a coin of a different description
248.  Whoever performs on any coin any operation which alters the appearance of that coin, with the intention that that coin shall pass as a coin of a different description, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 3 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 248]
Altering appearance of current coin with intent that it shall pass as a coin of a different description
249.  Whoever performs on any current coin any operation which alters the appearance of that coin, with the intention that that coin shall pass as a coin of a different description, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 7 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 249]
Delivery to another of coin possessed with the knowledge that it is altered
250.  Whoever, having coin in his possession with respect to which the offence defined in section 246 or 248 has been committed, and having known at the time when he became possessed of the coin that such offence had been committed with respect to it, fraudulently or with intent that fraud may be committed, delivers the coin to any other person, or attempts to induce any other person to receive the coin, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 5 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 250]
Delivery of current coin possessed with the knowledge that it is altered
251.  Whoever, having coin in his possession with respect to which the offence defined in section 247 or 249 has been committed, and having known at the time when he became possessed of the coin that such offence had been committed with respect to it, fraudulently or with intent that fraud may be committed, delivers the coin to any other person, or attempts to induce any other person to receive the coin, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 10 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 251]
Possession of altered coin by a person who knew it to be altered when he became possessed thereof
252.  Whoever, fraudulently or with intent that fraud may be committed, is in possession of coin with respect to which the offence defined in section 246 or 248 has been committed, having known at the time of becoming possessed thereof that that offence had been committed with respect to such coin, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 3 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
[51/2007]
[Indian PC 1860, s. 252]
Possession of current coin by a person who knew it to be altered when he became possessed thereof
253.  Whoever, fraudulently or with intent that fraud may be committed, is in possession of coin with respect to which the offence defined in section 247 or 249 has been committed, having known at the time of becoming possessed thereof that that offence had been committed with respect to such coin, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 5 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 253]
Delivery to another of coin as genuine, which when first possessed the deliverer did not know to be altered
254.  Whoever delivers to any other person as genuine or as a coin of a different description from what it is, or attempts to induce any person to receive as genuine or as a different coin from what it is, any coin in respect of which he knows that any such operation as that mentioned in section 246 or 248 has been performed, but in respect of which he did not, at the time when he took it into his possession, know that such operation had been performed, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 2 years, or with fine to an amount which may extend to 10 times the value of the coin for which the altered coin is passed or attempted to be passed.
[51/2007]
[Indian PC 1860, s. 254]
Delivery to another of current coin as genuine, which when first possessed the deliverer did not know to be altered
254A.  Whoever delivers to any other person as genuine or as a coin of a different description from what it is, or attempts to induce any person to receive as genuine or as a different coin from what it is, any coin in respect of which he knows that any such operation as that mentioned in section 247 or 249 has been performed, but in respect of which he did not, at the time when he took it into his possession, know that such operation had been performed, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 5 years, or with fine, or with both.
[51/2007]
Counterfeiting a Government stamp
*255.  Whoever counterfeits, or knowingly performs any part of the process of counterfeiting, any stamp issued by the Government for the purpose of revenue, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 10 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
[51/2007]
Explanation—A person who counterfeits by causing a genuine stamp of one denomination to appear like a genuine stamp of a different denomination commits this offence.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 255]
*  Pursuant to section 39(1) of the Stamp Duties (Amendment) Act 1999 (Act 33 of 1999), any reference to a Government stamp or stamp in sections 255 to 262 of the Penal Code (Cap. 224) shall be read as including a reference to a stamp certificate issued under the Stamp Duties Act (Cap. 312) as amended by the Stamp Duties (Amendment) Act 1999.
Having possession of an instrument or material for the purpose of counterfeiting a Government stamp
*256.  Whoever has in his possession any instrument or material for the purpose of being used, or knowing or having reason to believe that it is intended to be used, for the purpose of counterfeiting any stamp issued by the Government for the purpose of revenue, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 7 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 256]
*  Pursuant to section 39(1) of the Stamp Duties (Amendment) Act 1999 (Act 33 of 1999), any reference to a Government stamp or stamp in sections 255 to 262 of the Penal Code (Cap. 224) shall be read as including a reference to a stamp certificate issued under the Stamp Duties Act (Cap. 312) as amended by the Stamp Duties (Amendment) Act 1999.
Making or selling an instrument for the purpose of counterfeiting a Government stamp
*257.  Whoever makes, performs any part of the process of making, buys, sells or disposes of, any instrument for the purpose of being used, or knowing or having reason to believe that it is intended to be used, for the purpose of counterfeiting any stamp issued by the Government for the purpose of revenue, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 7 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 257]
*  Pursuant to section 39(1) of the Stamp Duties (Amendment) Act 1999 (Act 33 of 1999), any reference to a Government stamp or stamp in sections 255 to 262 of the Penal Code (Cap. 224) shall be read as including a reference to a stamp certificate issued under the Stamp Duties Act (Cap. 312) as amended by the Stamp Duties (Amendment) Act 1999.
Sale of counterfeit Government stamp
*258.  Whoever sells, or offers for sale, any stamp which he knows or has reason to believe to be a counterfeit of any stamp issued by the Government for the purpose of revenue, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 7 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 258]
*  Pursuant to section 39(1) of the Stamp Duties (Amendment) Act 1999 (Act 33 of 1999), any reference to a Government stamp or stamp in sections 255 to 262 of the Penal Code (Cap. 224) shall be read as including a reference to a stamp certificate issued under the Stamp Duties Act (Cap. 312) as amended by the Stamp Duties (Amendment) Act 1999.
Having possession of a counterfeit Government stamp
*259.  Whoever has in his possession any stamp which he knows to be a counterfeit of any stamp issued by the Government for the purpose of revenue, intending to use or dispose of the same as a genuine stamp, or in order that it may be used as a genuine stamp, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 7 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 259]
*  Pursuant to section 39(1) of the Stamp Duties (Amendment) Act 1999 (Act 33 of 1999), any reference to a Government stamp or stamp in sections 255 to 262 of the Penal Code (Cap. 224) shall be read as including a reference to a stamp certificate issued under the Stamp Duties Act (Cap. 312) as amended by the Stamp Duties (Amendment) Act 1999.
Using as genuine a Government stamp known to be counterfeit
*260.  Whoever uses as genuine any stamp, knowing it to be a counterfeit of any stamp issued by the Government for the purpose of revenue, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 7 years, or with fine, or with both.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 260]
*  Pursuant to section 39(1) of the Stamp Duties (Amendment) Act 1999 (Act 33 of 1999), any reference to a Government stamp or stamp in sections 255 to 262 of the Penal Code (Cap. 224) shall be read as including a reference to a stamp certificate issued under the Stamp Duties Act (Cap. 312) as amended by the Stamp Duties (Amendment) Act 1999.
Effacing any writing from a substance bearing a Government stamp, or removing from a document a stamp used for it, with intent to cause loss to Government
*261.  Whoever, fraudulently or with intent to cause loss to the Government, removes or effaces from any substance bearing any stamp issued by the Government for the purpose of revenue, any writing or document for which such stamp has been used, or removes from any writing or document a stamp which has been used for such writing or document, in order that such stamp may be used for a different writing or document, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 3 years, or with fine, or with both.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 261]
*  Pursuant to section 39(1) of the Stamp Duties (Amendment) Act 1999 (Act 33 of 1999), any reference to a Government stamp or stamp in sections 255 to 262 of the Penal Code (Cap. 224) shall be read as including a reference to a stamp certificate issued under the Stamp Duties Act (Cap. 312) as amended by the Stamp Duties (Amendment) Act 1999.
Using a Government stamp known to have been before used
*262.  Whoever, fraudulently or with intent to cause loss to the Government, uses for any purpose a stamp issued by the Government for the purpose of revenue, which he knows to have been before used, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 2 years, or with fine, or with both.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 262]
*  Pursuant to section 39(1) of the Stamp Duties (Amendment) Act 1999 (Act 33 of 1999), any reference to a Government stamp or stamp in sections 255 to 262 of the Penal Code (Cap. 224) shall be read as including a reference to a stamp certificate issued under the Stamp Duties Act (Cap. 312) as amended by the Stamp Duties (Amendment) Act 1999.
Erasure of mark denoting that stamp has been used
263.  Whoever, fraudulently or with intent to cause loss to the Government, erases or removes from a stamp issued by the Government for the purpose of revenue, any mark put or impressed upon such stamp for the purpose of denoting that the stamp has been used, or knowingly has in his possession, or sells or disposes of, any such stamp from which such mark has been erased or removed, or sells or disposes of any such stamp which he knows to have been used, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 3 years, or with fine, or with both.
[Indian PC 1860, s. 263]